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Author Topic: Interesting idea - will traditional colleges become obsolete Back to Topics
flyboyUT

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Utah

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Message Posted: May 19, 2013 5:42:41 PM

Will economics deal the liberal college professors a low card?.
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>>>Colleges, including commuter community colleges, cost money to run and build, and they cost ever more as even third- and fourth-tier institutions try to entice students. Most students earn a degree because the credential is required for almost all higher-paying jobs. If the cost is between $25,000 and $75,000, and more than $200,000 at elite schools, then that is the price that must be born.

But is it? That is where the burgeoning world of massively online education presents such an opportunity. Institutions like the University of Phoenix have been offering online courses since the 1990s, but this new wave is larger in scale and now includes traditional universities. Online courses cost a fraction of a brick-and-mortar education. New companies such as Udacity and Coursera have been experimenting with new models, ranging from per fee, limited-enrollment classes with select professors to the so-called MOOCs (“massive, open, online classes”) that attract tens of thousands of students per class. Coursera, barely a year old, already has 3.5 million registered users. Students anywhere in the country and indeed the world can sign up, take a course with skilled professors, meet with other students in their area for study groups and learn the material. Even more crucial, they assemble a menu of courses that combine pure learning and more-tailored vocational studies based on skills needed for particular jobs. And all for a fraction of the costs.<<<

It would break my heart to see more and more real competition come into the education field..... NOT
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xrdc
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 4:33:21 PM


With the dumbing down of our education system under the guise of "rigor" aka: Common Core, the SATs and ACTs are being rewritten to make kids "college ready" rather than university-caliber.

The Universities will become obsolete as more and more common core grads are unable to qualify for more than junior college.
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flyboyUT
Champion Author Utah

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 3:51:08 PM


Tim I will be the first to admit that I don't have all the answers for education concerns. But don't tell Marty I said so.

I hear you on providing an adequate education for all. I do know that when I went to catholic grade and high schools that they didn't toss out kids just because they were discipline problems. Some kids left because they couldn't deal with having to obey the rules but the administration didn't tell them to leave.

How we balance the freedom to send you kids to what schools you want as opposed to funding a network of schools for all is a tough nut to crack for sure.

Maybe one way might be to get the Feds out of what should be a local and state function.

But the real subject of the topic is college level education and how to reduce costs. Maybe we should look at the model we have now. Do we need the system as it exists now or is there something that will do a better job for less cost?
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I75at7AM
Champion Author Dayton

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 3:33:54 PM

I don't think traditional colleges and universities are going to disappear, but it would be nice if they became more price competitive. (My daughter is one year until.....)
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teacher_tim
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 1:58:45 PM

Part of the problem lies in within the necessity of every state providing for the education of every child. States must fund for schools and teachers for every student, regardless of whether they choose to attend a non-state school. Funding might work if the parents/child decided in advance which school to attend and then had to stick with that choice. Most private/parochial schools do not offer Special Education services and expell students with behavior problems. Public schools cannot do this. Public schools can only send disruptive students to alternative education sites or offer home teacher visits; both of which cost more. There are several students in my school who have full-time assistants who travel with them from class to class. Try finding that in a private school.
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flyboyUT
Champion Author Utah

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 10:43:53 AM

Tim one way to star in the lower schools would be to implement the voucher system - the money goes with the child concept. Each child gets "x" amount of dollars per year and can use it in whatever accredited school they want.

60+ years back when I went to grade school the folks sent me to a Parochial school. We got a superior education but the folks had to pay the property taxes to support the state schools plus the Catholic school costs. Somehow that doesn't sound right to me. Parents shouldn't have to pay twice to send their kids to a school they like. The 'homeschoolers' are in a similar situation now. They pay taxes for supporting the state run schools and don't use them..

Interesting concept for sure. How to improve the education of our kids and how to get parents to be interested in what kind of education their kids get.....
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teacher_tim
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: May 21, 2013 10:29:37 AM

It will be interesting to see how this catches on and if it may apply to K-12 education in the future.
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