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Author Topic: Is It Time For Christians To Leave the Republican Party? Back to Topics
Passer

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New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 5:49:37 PM

I just again watched the classic "It's A Wonderful Life". I was struck that one of the major characters, Mr. Henry F. Potter, would so easily fit in with the Republican Party of the 21st Century. Perhaps it is time for those Christians who find fault with Mr. Potter to reaffirm the true Christian Values of George Baily and the Democratic Party or cast their fate with a Trump and what the Bible says about such a rich character's chances of heaven. I don't mean to "needle" him in this thread about his chances on his camel going through its eye, but Mark 10:25 makes it pretty clear about casting one's fate with GOP Prophet Trump and even Leader Limbaugh and their 21st Century Republican Sheep than Mr. Baily and his Democratic Principles.

What do you think?
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 6, 2012 1:09:43 AM

Correction: Typo (leaving out "room") and to be clearer:




But the problem is,

not much room for anything else

(and the belief that everyone else is going to hell on a hand-basket).



[Edited by: Passer at 12/6/2012 1:11:00 AM EST]
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 6, 2012 12:55:28 AM

"christians alwways welcome!!"

True. So very, very true.


But the problem is,


not much else!
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daylily2009
Champion Author Fayetteville

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Message Posted: Dec 5, 2012 9:34:19 PM

christians alwways welcome!!
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 5, 2012 5:45:15 PM

As far as content, maybe yes, maybe no. But at least now it's legal and Fair which follows Old Time Conservative ideals --

if not necessarily the newer. And you shouldn't want it any other way unless you wished to whittle at your point (of which its sharpness itself might be open to debate)...
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theTower
Champion Author Indiana

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Message Posted: Dec 3, 2012 9:03:42 PM

You probably have heard .......s & loan business is hit by a crisis.
George is preparing to jump off the town bridge into the icy river below ............The angel, Clarence, then portrays Potterville as a decadent, corrupt, drunken burg in

is that better Passer?
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MiddletownMarty
Champion Author Connecticut

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Message Posted: Dec 3, 2012 7:14:45 PM

"In a state with restricted primaries, the only reason to register with the Party that does not reflect one's political values--is to have a say in the Primary."

Truth be known... I flipped a coin to decide. So, I vote for the primary candidate whom I think is the best choice, assuming such a candidate exists. In the last Connecticut Republican primary, such a candidate didn't exist so I cast no vote.
I vote for the person; not the party label.



[Edited by: MiddletownMarty at 12/3/2012 7:18:39 PM EST]
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Teslukbla
Champion Author Missouri

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Message Posted: Dec 3, 2012 6:55:27 PM

"In a state with restricted primaries, the only reason to register with the Party that does not reflect one's political values--is to have a say in the Primary."

Another reason could be if one resides in a one party county or municipality. There are many cities and counties where all of the elected officials are of the same party and where the opposing party does not contest races.
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 3, 2012 6:25:39 PM

"In a state with restricted primaries, the only reason to register with the Party that does not reflect one's political values--is to have a say in the Primary."

Even so, some could do it for opposite reasons:

1. Vote for what they think is a scoundrel who will be easily beaten by their man...

2. Vote for the one that they think is closest to their views so that even if he wins in the general election it will be the lesser of the evils than if the "extremist" on the other side won.

(You would do the second if you thought that that party usually won the district or #1 if by getting nominated he would make your party's chances better.)

But above all, in order for Democracy to work, you need members of all religions to participate in all or at least most of the Parties. As soon as Party's become religiously based, you lose most of the advantages that Democracy brings!
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ministorage
Champion Author Louisville

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 7:25:34 PM

Middletown Marty, why did you register as a Republican as opposed to Democrat--which, according to the plethora of your posts here on GasBuddy, IS NOT the party whose values fit with YOURS? You are registered with a party that does NOT fit your values. There IS a reason. You did it for a REASON.

In a state with restricted primaries, the only reason to register with the Party that does not reflect one's political values--is to have a say in the Primary.

MM = BUSTED

[Edited by: ministorage at 12/2/2012 7:32:47 PM EST]
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ministorage
Champion Author Louisville

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 7:23:09 PM

"I registered as Republican because I was forced to choose one of two parties, or else give up my vote in both primaries."

That does NOT describe WHY you registered as a Republican.
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MiddletownMarty
Champion Author Connecticut

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 7:18:33 PM

"Which tells the real story why you are a Republican--to make sure the most liberal Republican goes against the Dem (in case the Dem loses) in the General erection."

Is that some sort of Freudian slip?

I registered as Republican because I was forced to choose one of two parties, or else give up my vote in both primaries. That I'm a Republican in no way guarantees my vote either for the Republican nor against the Democrat candidate. I've voted for candidates of both parties, of neither party, and on rare occasions, no candidate at all.

[Edited by: MiddletownMarty at 12/2/2012 7:21:01 PM EST]
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ministorage
Champion Author Louisville

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 7:07:56 PM

"But wouldn't that hurt the Democrat the most in a hotly contested election in all but a very Conservative district? Democrats generally do better against more Conservative Republicans if they have a chance to win than they do against more Liberal Republicans."

I understand your logic, but this IS a safety net logic that many voters try in states with restricted primaries--to guarantee the most liberal Republican candidate, in case the Republican wins in the General.

The reverse is also true. My parents were conservative, however my father was a Democrat; he voted for the most conservative Democrat in the primary and then the Republican candidate in the General. Until two years ago, I was also a Democrat, but unlike my father, I always voted for the Democrat in the General.

[Edited by: ministorage at 12/2/2012 7:13:19 PM EST]
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:51:50 PM

"Which tells the real story why you are a Republican--to make sure the most liberal Republican goes against the Dem (in case the Dem loses) in the General erection."

But wouldn't that hurt the Democrat the most in a hotly contested election in all but a very Conservative district?

Democrats generally do better against more Conservative Republicans if they have a chance to win than they do against more Liberal Republicans.
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ministorage
Champion Author Louisville

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:42:35 PM

"Something else to consider... in some states (Connecticut, for example), you must register as a Democrat or Republican in order to vote in the respective primaries. Registering as an Independent precludes you from having a say in which candidate ultimately goes on the ballot."

Which tells the real story why you are a Republican--to make sure the most liberal Republican goes against the Dem (in case the Dem loses) in the General erection.

[Edited by: ministorage at 12/2/2012 6:44:40 PM EST]
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:34:51 PM

(He tried to make a "U" turn too fast and all that it turned out to be to too many not of the Right, was a "Fork-U")

<VBG>
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:32:18 PM

NJ is like that too. I believe that this cycle in which the Republicans had a contested Primary, may have cost them the presidency because mostly the extreme of the base had to be played to and the Independents, who were shut out to a great degree, had no voice and were responsible for Romney's tongue, forking Right and he had too little time to get his many, many faces to turn a bit left until it was too late.



[Edited by: Passer at 12/2/2012 6:36:16 PM EST]
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MiddletownMarty
Champion Author Connecticut

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:18:22 PM

Something else to consider... in some states (Connecticut, for example), you must register as a Democrat or Republican in order to vote in the respective primaries. Registering as an Independent precludes you from having a say in which candidate ultimately goes on the ballot.
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Passer
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 6:07:22 PM

Perhaps Republicans (with the exception of Cheney who actually was responsible for a few) accuse the Democrats of having too many bleeding hearts? Is that so "anti-Christian"?

While the Republicans can not be accused of being "bleeding hearts" (again, in Cheney's case he can be accused of causing a few friends hearts to more than murmur but we digress...) if there is a typo by adding an "f" to "hearts" and thereby creating a "hearts" prefix one might get closer to the truth with what some of the GOP stinkers have bleeding.

And why not, after all they've stuffed into their backslides it is no wonder that they are out for blood...
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MiddletownMarty
Champion Author Connecticut

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Message Posted: Dec 2, 2012 5:55:53 PM

I was thinking about this very question earlier today. Does one leave the Democrat Party because of its pro-choice and same-sex marriage positions? Does one leave the Republican Party because of its aversion to helping the poor and its leaving the sick to fend for themselves?

[Edited by: MiddletownMarty at 12/2/2012 5:59:03 PM EST]
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