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Author Topic: News Release: EPA Proposes 2014 Renewable Fuel Standards Back to Topics
Kinglemuel

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North Carolina

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Message Posted: Nov 19, 2013 11:53:42 AM

11/18/2013

Contact:
Enesta Jones
jones.enesta@epa.gov
202-564-7873
202-564-4355
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 15, 2013

EPA Proposes 2014 Renewable Fuel Standards
Proposal Seeks Input to Address “E10 Blend Wall,” Reaffirms Commitment to Biofuels

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed for public comment the levels of renewable fuels to be blended into gasoline and diesel as required by Congress under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Developed with input from the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Agriculture, the proposal seeks public input on annual volume requirements for renewable fuels in all motor vehicle gasoline and diesel produced or imported by the United States in 2014. The proposal seeks to put the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program on a steady path forward – ensuring the continued long-term growth of the renewable fuel industry – while seeking input on different approaches to address the “E10 blend wall.”
“Biofuels are a key part of the Obama Administration’s “all of the above” energy strategy, helping to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, cut carbon pollution and create jobs,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “We have made great progress in recent years, and EPA continues to support the RFS goal of increasing biofuel production and use. We look forward to working with all stakeholders to develop a final rule that maintains the strength and promise of the RFS program.”

The proposal discusses a variety of approaches for setting the 2014 standards, and includes a number of production and consumption ranges for key categories of biofuel covered by the RFS program. The proposal seeks comment on a range of total renewable fuel volumes for 2014 and proposes a level within that range of 15.21 billion gallons. Specifically, EPA is seeking comment on the following proposed volumes:

Category Proposed Volume a Range
Cellulosic biofuel 17 mill gal 8-30 million gallons
Biomass-based diesel 1.28 bill gal 1.28 billion gallons
Advanced biofuel 2.20 bill gal 2.0-2.51 billion gallons
Renewable fuel 15.21 bill gal 15.00-15.52 billion gallons
aAll volumes are ethanol-equivalent, except for biomass-based diesel which is actual

Nearly all gasoline sold in the U.S. is now “E10,” which is fuel with up to 10 percent ethanol. Production of renewable fuels has been growing rapidly in recent years. At the same time, advances in vehicle fuel economy and other economic factors have pushed gasoline consumption far lower than what was expected when Congress passed the Renewable Fuel Standard in 2007. As a result, we are now at the “E10 blend wall,” the point at which the E10 fuel pool is saturated with ethanol. If gasoline demand continues to decline, as currently forecast, continuing growth in the use of ethanol will require greater use of higher ethanol blends such as E15 and E85.

The Obama Administration has taken a number of steps to allow or encourage the use of these higher ethanol blends. In 2010, EPA approved E15 for use in vehicles newer than model year 2001, and developed labeling rules to enable retailers to market E15. In addition, since 2011, USDA has made funding available through the Renewable Energy Assistance Program to support deployment of “flex-fuel” pumps that can dispense a range of ethanol blends. The 2014 proposal seeks input on what additional actions could be taken by government and industry to help overcome current market challenges, and to minimize the need for adjustments in the statutory renewable fuel volume requirements in the future. Looking forward, the proposal clearly indicates that growth in capacity for ethanol consumption would continuously be reflected in the standards set beyond 2014. EPA looks forward to further engagement and additional information from stakeholders as the agency works in consultation with the Departments of Agriculture and Energy toward the development of a final rule.

The renewable fuels program was developed by Congress in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and expand the nation’s renewable fuels sector while reducing reliance on foreign oil. The standards determine how much renewable fuel a refiner or importer is responsible for, and are designed to achieve the national volumes for each type of renewable fuel.

Today, in a separate action, EPA is also seeking comment on petitions for a waiver of the renewable fuel standards that would apply in 2014. EPA expects that a determination on the substance of the petitions will be issued at the same time that EPA issues a final rule establishing the 2014 RFS.

Once the proposal is published in the Federal Register, it will be open to a 60-day public comment period.

More information on the standards and regulations: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/fuels/renewablefuels/regulations.htm

More information on renewable fuels: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/fuels/renewablefuels/index.htm

R185
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
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thebrohta167
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Jan 24, 2014 8:22:56 AM

ummm, no more ethanol in gasoline. more in beverages would be nice though.
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bluenvoy
Champion Author Nashville

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Message Posted: Jan 23, 2014 10:55:39 AM

Disband the EPA.
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namzza6310
Champion Author Milwaukee

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Message Posted: Jan 20, 2014 8:36:26 AM

Give us more ethanol
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SoylentGrain
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Jan 20, 2014 7:44:34 AM

"Actually there has been. One of the things that has happened has been the development of corn types that are optimized for fuel, not consumption by people. While the supply of corn has gone up, the supply of corn for human consumption has not. Corn now costs about 4X what it was when our ethanol legislation was enacted."

Some fabrication going on by Houckster. For the past decade, the corn surplus has been measured in hundreds of millions of bushels. Surplus means more corn than can be consumed, real product sitting in storage on the farm or in a grain elevator. There is no shortage driving up food prices and starving children.

As far as price goes, corn sold for $3.25 in 1974. Today, it sells for about $4 a bushel. Had the price kept up with inflation, it would be selling for $17 a bushel today. But, it's not. Production exceeds demand and the price remains low.

Nov 8th USDA SUPPLY & DEMAND Report
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peregrin
Champion Author Baltimore

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Message Posted: Jan 19, 2014 10:23:20 PM

get the corn outta my tank!
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Kinglemuel
All-Star Author North Carolina

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Message Posted: Jan 13, 2014 11:22:38 PM

Heh, my post of this new article generated some serious discussion, unlike some of my other posts.
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RS101
Champion Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Dec 12, 2013 10:03:03 PM

Sure Sure Sure
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Shockjock1961
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Dec 5, 2013 9:33:04 AM

Proof positive that the only way that ethanol sells is if the government forces you to buy it:

Ethanol mills face closures as Obama cuts target

"A cut in the mandate means plants will be shut down, there'll be layoffs," said Christopher Standlee, a St. Louis- based spokesman for Abengoa SA, which operates six bioethanol mills in the U.S. "The remaining plants will be less profitable and more reluctant to keep investing."
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darwinfinch
Veteran Author Gasbuddy

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Message Posted: Nov 26, 2013 10:15:13 AM

oil = wholesome goodness
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xkegroller
Champion Author Knoxville

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 7:42:40 PM

corn = corruption
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SilverStreaker
Champion Author Twin Cities

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 2:46:43 PM

I have been running high ethanol blends in my non-FFVs for about 4 years and have never used any additives. I've never had an ethanol related performance or maintenance issue.
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darwinfinch
Veteran Author Gasbuddy

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 12:04:34 PM

I LOL every time I see an advertisement for Ethanol Defender.
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Hannie59
All-Star Author Appleton

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 10:25:13 AM

Ethanol Defense. LOL Houckster
How gullible can you be? Pay money for something to undo all the good done by the ethanol. LOL seriously, a fool and their money are soon parted.

I have been running high percentages than the "recommended" for many years and EXTENDING my engine lives with E-30 and beyond.

[Edited by: Hannie59 at 11/25/2013 10:25:33 AM EST]
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krzysiek_ck
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 10:16:21 AM

MertieMan wrote: "It is also a detriment to gas mileage especially in the winter combined with "winter blend" gas and ethanol. With these two you can expect about 1-4 miles per gallon less in the winter time."

Ethanol has nothing to do with the "winter blend", or the lower MPGs in the winter time.

"In winter, it’s cold, and so refineries are allowed to produce gasoline that evaporates more easily. So they maximize the cheap, low energy butane in the mix. Any benefit of your car starting more readily is really limited to old and/or poorly maintained vehicles. Current vehicle technology is pretty hardy.

What’s the result? Well, basically, winter blend gasoline has a larger percentage of butane in it. And since butane is cheaper and has less energy, winter blend thus costs less and gives us a lower MPG when we burn it."

Winter vs Summer Gasoline… yes there is a difference

[Edited by: krzysiek_ck at 11/25/2013 10:17:14 AM EST]
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tropicalmn
Veteran Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 9:44:29 AM

Houckster wrote "Corn now costs about 4X what it was when our ethanol legislation was enacted. This increase has been felt through the range of products that depend on some form of corn leading to higher food prices on the vast majority of items on the food shelves."
Obliviously you don't even have the foggiest clue what corn now costs ( about 2X at most) or other factors effecting grocery food prices.Sounds like you're quoting "Shocky Facts" which are based on hysteria,propaganda & simply pure BS.
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MertieMan
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 9:40:08 AM

It is also a detriment to gas mileage especially in the winter combined with "winter blend" gas and ethanol. With these two you can expect about 1-4 miles per gallon less in the winter time.
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LowCountryAl
Rookie Author South Carolina

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Message Posted: Nov 25, 2013 8:10:29 AM

CNBC's take: What can cool the ethanol market? The EPA

E10 is approved for and has not caused any known trouble with my 2001 S10's 4.3L V6. However, E10 can cause problems with lawn equipment and some marine engines. Fortunately for those who need it, 87 non-ethanol is now available in my vicinity for $3.39 gallon.

[Edited by: LowCountryAl at 11/25/2013 8:10:59 AM EST]
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 1:04:48 PM

The RFS was enacted in 2005.
The price of corn in 2005 was lower than in 1981 through 1985, and 1988 through 1998, and 2002 through 2004.
Yes, higher prices came about the 2011 and 2012, but higher prices came up the EXACT SAME 2 years for soybeans, wheat, calves, cattle, hogs, and milk. The tracking info comes from the University of Illinois. The charts show ups and downs like a roller coaster from 1981 to 2012, the years I have had E10 available.
Market forces at work.

In comparison, oil surpassed $145/barrel in 2008.
They dropped to just over $60/barrel.
In 2010, they went back up over $90 barrel, and over $112/barrel in 2011. It has hovered around $100 much of 2013.
Market forces at work.

Prices go up, prices go down, on thousands of commodities, and are affected by speculators and traders.
Oil is used to make gasoline, and diesel, and the price of oil affects not only the cost of transportation, but the whole economy.
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Shockjock1961
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 12:44:16 PM

Now Houckster, don't let facts get in the way of the propaganda being spewed by the ethanol shills...
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Houckster
Champion Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 11:52:01 AM

RUMPLESEAT writes: There is no diversion of corn from food to fuel, if there was, there would be a shortage of corn in the stores. That has NOT happened, and the US is still a major exporter of corn to other countries.
The truth is, when the demand for corn went up, farmers planted more! They aren't dummies.
_____
Actually there has been. One of the things that has happened has been the development of corn types that are optimized for fuel, not consumption by people. While the supply of corn has gone up, the supply of corn for human consumption has not. Corn now costs about 4X what it was when our ethanol legislation was enacted. This increase has been felt through the range of products that depend on some form of corn leading to higher food prices on the vast majority of items on the food shelves.

Ethanol has also incentivized farmers to put land in production that is not appropriate for agriculture leading to CO2 emissions and increased nitrogen and phosphorus runoffs in our streams and rivers. The dead zone in the Gulf has also increased in size.
______
RUMPLESEAT writes: Food has gone up because of the cost of transportation, which is fuel, the cost of vehicles, maintenance on them, wages, taxes, packaging, heating/cooling costs, insurance, and on and on, ALL of which have gone up. It has gone up in Western Canada as well, and most of our ethanol is made from waste wheat!
______
While these things do influence the prices, I suspect the increased cost of corn is far more responsible for the increases we have seen as I pointed out above.
______
RUMPLESEAT writes: I have been using E10 since 1981. Please tell me when I can expect the "bad for engines" part!
______
People do tend to overestimate the damage to engines with E10 if were talking about car engines that are designed to tolerate up to 10% ethanol but beyond that point, I have doubts about the safety of E15. Other engines (older outboard engines, gas tanks, and lawnmowers, for example) that were not designed with ethanol in mind do suffer damage. I had hopes that we would actually cut back on ethanol this year but the EPA proposal above leaves me disappointed. I am concerned enough that I'm adding a product called Ethanol Defense to my gas to protect it from any possible problems with E10 and richer ethanol blends.

[Edited by: Houckster at 11/22/2013 11:54:26 AM EST]
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 7:48:50 AM

"Diverting Corn from the Food Systems has also raised the price of Food such as Beef, Chicken and other food items dependent on Corn! Ethanol lowers the MPG that a vehicle gets and is bad on engines."

Unfortunately, somebody has fed you the OPEC Koolaid!
There is no diversion of corn from food to fuel, if there was, there would be a shortage of corn in the stores. That has NOT happened, and the US is still a major exporter of corn to other countries.
The truth is, when the demand for corn went up, farmers planted more! They aren't dummies.
Food has gone up because of the cost of transportation, which is fuel, the cost of vehicles, maintenance on them, wages, taxes, packaging, heating/cooling costs, insurance, and on and on, ALL of which have gone up. It has gone up in Western Canada as well, and most of our ethanol is made from waste wheat!
I have been using E10 since 1981. Please tell me when I can expect the "bad for engines" part!

"it takes Non-Renewable Fuels to convert the Corn to Fuel to be used in the vehicles!"
It takes more non-renewable fossil fuel to make a gallon of gasoline than to make a gallon of ethanol, including equipment and transportation costs!
Ethanol also has a positive energy return, despite the tendency of people to keep repeating claims made back in the 1980s that have long since been disproved by studies by government, several universities, and research groups.



[Edited by: rumbleseat at 11/22/2013 7:50:50 AM EST]
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zippy3231
Champion Author Jacksonville

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 5:30:00 AM

Ethanol does not reduce Green House Gas as it takes Non-Renewable Fuels to convert the Corn to Fuel to be used in the vehicles! It is great for the Corn Growers and the associaTED Chemical Companies!

Diverting Corn from the Food Systems has also raised the price of Food such as Beef, Chicken and other food items dependent on Corn! Ethanol lowers the MPG that a vehicle gets and is bad on engines. All in All Ethanol s a bad product!
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kennyman
Champion Author Alberta

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Message Posted: Nov 22, 2013 1:11:08 AM

Ok.
OOOOOpsy. Naughty Naughty.

[Edited by: kennyman at 11/22/2013 1:12:48 AM EST]
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Gas_Buddy
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: Nov 21, 2013 1:52:17 PM

Several things:

First, Gas Buddy rules are that you do not post articles in their entirety on the message forum (this is, in part, for copyright reasons). Guidance is that you post a snippet of the article and then post a link to where others can read the rest.

Simply type your message (whatever it is you want to say or get across to other members) into the Reply box, up to the point where you want to provide a link. Then click on "Insert Link" next to the text area. A dialog box will appear. Type (or paste) the URL into the dialog's input field making sure not to end up with two copies of the http:// prefix!.

Then, type in the description (or whatever you want to call your link) and click "OK". Now you're back to your regular message input, but some programming text (from Gas Buddy) has been added that encodes the link information. Type the rest of your message as normal.

Second, if you're only looking to see what others have to say about what you're posting, especially if it's a news article, simply say "I have no opinion; I found this interesting; let me know your views", or something similar. That said, it's hard to believe that a person would post a story for everyone to see but have no opinion whatsoever about the issue. If you don't have any opinion whatsoever, why post the story or article? Even if it's just a "Hmmm, I found this interesting but I'm entirely open-minded about the issue..." is better than nothing.

Third, I agree that most one-word or one-number responses are useless, but many of those are in response to questions that ask "Do you...?" (which is only asking for a yes/no response), "How many..." or "What's the best". If all that's being asked is for a one-word response, that's all that most will provide, and an intelligent response will simply get lost in the one-word responses.

What you can do, if you want to share news articles, especially if it's just to pass the information to others (without looking for any response or without any substantive input on your part) is to post the article in the "Daily News Article Discussions" discussion category or you can submit it via the "Submit News" link which can be found under the "GasBuddy Blog & News" section on the middle left of the home page.

Just suggestions; that's all. Just suggestions.

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Kinglemuel
All-Star Author North Carolina

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Message Posted: Nov 21, 2013 12:47:53 PM

Gas Buddy,
This forum thing is new to me. As you mentioned, my intention was to say "Hey everyone. I saw this article and while I don't have any opinion about it (that I want to share), you should read it." I put it here as it deals with Ethanol standards, also posted it on the news forum.
I thought this would be a much better post that all the stupid one word posts that I have seen; obviously, most people are just mining for points instead of sharing something of value.
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Gas_Buddy
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: Nov 19, 2013 6:19:47 PM

Sorry, but you posted a news article. You could have done that in the daily news discussion category, or you could have posted a link to the story.

But what's the purpose of posting the whole article? What do you want people to do besides read it? Are you saying the article is true, accurate, false, that you agree with or you disagree with the points made in the article? Or what? Do you have an opinion about the article that you want us to know about, or are you simply saying: "Hey everyone. I saw this article and while I don't have any opinion about it, you should read it."

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