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Author Topic: Record Corn Crop Forecast Back to Topics
gamechanger2011

Champion Author
Wichita

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Message Posted: Aug 19, 2013 1:29:49 PM


"Corn production is forecast at 13.8 billion bushels, up 28 percent from 2012. If realized, this will be a new record production for the United States. Based on conditions as of August 1, yields are expected to average 154.4 bushels per acre, up 31.0 bushels from 2012. If realized, this will be the highest average yield since 2009. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 89.1 million acres, unchanged from the June forecast but up 2 percent from 2012".
Record Corn Crop Forecast
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 19, 2013 3:07:11 AM

"Please use corn for food only!" Some folks just do not have a clue.
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minookaband
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Sep 18, 2013 11:27:31 PM

Please use corn for food only!
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 18, 2013 2:37:28 AM

Actually corn still is used for food. 2/3 of the bushel weight of corn is returned to the food chain as ddgs and corn oil after ethanol production. There is actually more corn and corn products in the food chain now than ever before.
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krzysiek_ck
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Sep 17, 2013 2:06:29 PM

Chazzer wrote: "corn should be used for food! Not for a gasoline supplement."

Why not both?
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Chazzer
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 17, 2013 12:58:04 PM

Too bad ... corn should be used for food! Not for a gasoline supplement.
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minookaband
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Sep 14, 2013 1:35:14 PM

good for them
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dassfg
Champion Author Fort Worth

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Message Posted: Sep 13, 2013 8:29:36 AM

Good for corn
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smugutu1234
Champion Author Tallahassee

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Message Posted: Sep 13, 2013 7:22:40 AM

Wonder why?
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 13, 2013 4:51:05 AM

The latest crop production report that was released yesterday shows 13.8 billion bushels projected for this years harvest. We will know in a few short weeks.
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 10, 2013 2:56:26 AM

The overall crop condition shows corn increasing slightly over last week with 56% G-E. Even so, I do not like the dent figure of 64%. The next few weeks could be could be critical.
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stickyvalves
Champion Author Iowa

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Message Posted: Sep 5, 2013 9:40:58 AM

12.8 will provide all with plenty of corn. Don't worry. No one needs to go hungry.
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borsht
Champion Author Oakland

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Message Posted: Sep 4, 2013 10:56:58 AM

With ethanol mandates in place, Corn production will continue to break records. Other grains will diminish in production.
Wheat may grow a little ,because meat producer will be forced to switch to wheat.
NOTE that in April of 2012, Stanford University’s Center on Food Security and Environment presented a talk by Rosamond Naylor titled “Biofuels: the Changing Nature of Agricultural Demand”. This presentation was quite thorough in explaining how mandated biofuels policies are changing the economics and world demand of food commodities.
Naylor gave us the following scenario, to demonstrate the ripple effect of ethanol policy…. As U.S. farmers grow more corn and less soy, Brazil takes up a greater share of the soy market, which causes a land use change. As corn demand rises, prices rise and wheat becomes substituted for corn in livestock feeds. Thus, the wheat price rises. (We are seeing this right now.) As wheat prices rise, consumers throughout the world shift from bread to rice, causing rice prices to rise.
“With serious disruption in oil markets, demand for biofuels could expand almost indefinitely….”
The mandated use of corn for ethanol in the United States is set to plateau in the year 2015. Currently 40 percent of the corn crop in the U.S. goes towards ethanol production (more this year because of the drought). Last year, for the first time ever, more corn was used to produce ethanol than was used to feed livestock in this nation. We are increasing the amount of corn demanded for ethanol production until it reaches a level of 15 billion gallons in the year 2015 according to our revised 2010 Renewable Fuels Standard policy. The industry also desires an expansion of both ethanol and distillers grains in export markets.
While the policy of ethanol seems firmly in place today, the current economics of corn ethanol production is ailing. Some ethanol plants have been idled in recent months due to high corn costs which make the product unprofitable. To make corn ethanol production profitable, the industry desires low corn prices and high gasoline prices. A bonus is that today’s low natural gas prices help profit margins.
Some analysts are suggesting that oil prices may be lower over the next year or two. Today’s corn prices following our Midwestern drought are high. The coming two years may be very interesting in seeing how this plays out both economically and politically for the ethanol industry.

http://www.bigpictureagriculture.com/2012/11/text deleted
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stickyvalves
Champion Author Iowa

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Message Posted: Sep 2, 2013 5:38:16 PM

Spotty rainfall around Iowa this weekend. We missed it. I think the heat and wind has reduced yield potential substantially. My 12.8 is much closer than the 13.8 is. We'll know later who is correct.
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WhiskeyBurner
Veteran Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Sep 1, 2013 9:27:36 PM

I thought there was going to be some more rain here tonight Soylent, it it happens, I hope you get some out that way too. If anything kicks off with Syria, a good corn crop will be a lifesaver from a fuel perspective. The 200 will definately stay drunk and I'll probably have no choice but to start spiking the Jeep's fuel up to as much as 20% on a regular basis.
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33gort33
Champion Author Indiana

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Message Posted: Sep 1, 2013 8:22:37 PM

yipp...I believe it
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Aug 24, 2013 3:41:20 AM

Rain all day yesterday.
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SoylentGrain
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Aug 23, 2013 8:07:28 AM

Things have looked good up until two weeks ago in much of Iowa. It's dry. The area where I own land missed the rain that came through. This is a critical growing phase for corn and beans. Both will be hurt.
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aRBy
All-Star Author Grand Rapids

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Message Posted: Aug 22, 2013 10:13:33 PM

It's been a long time since I've seen the corn look this good.

Yet food prices continue to rise. (You forgot to mention that.) Of course, when the EPA pushes electricity prices through the roof and OPEC pushes petroleum prices through the roof, those frozen peas and refrigerated meats get pretty expensive.

It's not corn and/or ethanol that's pushing food prices up. It's the cost of petroleum (first) and the price of electricity. I'd also add that the consolidation of food producing companies into a handful of large multi-national corporations doesn't necessarily help the matter.
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33gort33
Champion Author Indiana

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Message Posted: Aug 22, 2013 9:18:49 AM

corn is corn...whether it's feeding cattle or fueling cars.

It'll be a bumper crop.

I just ran Indiana, southern Illinois, central Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, northern Illinois, and northern Indiana. All crops (*especially Iowa*) looked like incredible fields of both corn and beans.

My trip was over 8 days.

I expect an amazing amount of surplus this harvest season.
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aRBy
All-Star Author Grand Rapids

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Message Posted: Aug 20, 2013 11:30:56 PM

The corn here in Michigan is the best I've seen it for years. It looks like Illinois corn.

Michigan grows a LOT of different crops; not just corn and beans. As such, corn doesn't always get the TLC it gets in the big corn-growing states like Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Indiana etc.

When Michigan corn looks THIS good, I gotta believe corn in the main cornbelt states is looking really good.
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stickyvalves
Champion Author Iowa

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Message Posted: Aug 20, 2013 4:45:18 PM

Keep in mind this USDA report was made as of Aug 1. Since then, the crop condition report has declined and so have yield prospects. The total production will still be above 2012, but probably not the 13.8 on the Aug 1 report.

The most up to date prospective yield numbers are this week on the Pro Farmer Crop Tour.
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