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Author Topic: The Corn Lobby will kill your older car ! Back to Topics
RTN

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South Carolina

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Message Posted: Jun 13, 2013 9:07:42 AM

The corn lobby will kill your older car !
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Jun 18, 2013 3:27:30 AM

"I've never had the slightest ethanol fuel-related problem in all the years of burning this killer product in a complete line of engines."

Darn, that nasty ole ethanol.
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Jun 17, 2013 7:47:10 AM

Paraphrasing Homer Simpson - ethanol seems to be the cause of, and the cure for, all our problems.

I've never had the slightest ethanol fuel-related problem in all the years of burning this killer product in a complete line of engines.
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stickyvalves
Champion Author Iowa

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 8:32:21 PM

I also operated many carbureted autos on gasohol in the 1980 era. No problems.
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 8:04:18 PM

"pile of sensationalist horse manure" Hmmmm. Hey Rumble, I could use a truckload. It works wonders on my garden.
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skh150
Sophomore Author Denver

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 4:49:37 PM

What?
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ggg452
Champion Author Manitoba

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 1:40:09 PM

WOW...sounds like fear mongering to me.
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FrankLee1
All-Star Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 7:23:10 AM

Rumble = correct. In MN you basically run E10 in everything- mowers, outboards, chainsaws, carb'd cars and motorcycles... whatever. Been doing this for decades with minimal issues i.e. the occasional clear small engine fuel line that breaks (perhaps it would have aged and failed with straight gas too). Been running my '59 Bel Air with the original, untouched 283 on E10 for 13 years with zero ethanol issues; no hardened valve seats either. I dropped the gas tank on my '92 Tempo which for years I've been running E85 blends in- and sometimes straight E85- and it was absolutely clean and corrosion free on the inside (can't say the same for the outside, thanks for nothing salt trucks).

The article is disingenuous by not making making a clear distinction between the effects of low ethanol concentrations of E10, E15 and so on vs high concentrations like E85. They are NOT the same and only the willfully ignorant would think so. P.S. Borsht = idiot.

[Edited by: FrankLee1 at 6/16/2013 7:26:51 AM EST]
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 5:57:29 AM

Thanks rumble. Your posts speak volumes.
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Jun 16, 2013 5:07:16 AM

This article is a pile of sensationalist horse manure. If our family 1974 Chev, 1974 Dart, 1976 Valiant, 1976 Mercury, 1974 Mercury all thrived on E10, as far back as 1981, as did our family 1986 Oldsmobile, and 1986 Ford, that is a decent track record. I think I have replaced 3 fuel filters in my life, 1 was a replacement of a wrong one installed by a previous owner so that hardly counts, and had 1 carburetor rebuilt, in 1979, and never had to replace or service any other fuel system parts.
There are a LOT of older cars around, we have quite a club of vintage car owners in this area, they seem to have a better handle on it than the writer of this article.
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Jun 15, 2013 9:03:36 PM

Hannie59 - even when you don't write you still say volumes. Thanks for your energy!
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Hannie59
All-Star Author Appleton

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Message Posted: Jun 15, 2013 9:15:47 AM

I promised I wouldn't write here for a month. So I will not comment on this but have to post this link.

Please read if you have a minute.
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Jun 15, 2013 8:18:33 AM

I was actually interested in this discussion until I got to "alcohol-caused fuel system corrosion (think gas tanks, steel fuel lines)" and realized this was now trying to take us off to voodoo science land so I shut it down.

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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Jun 15, 2013 4:40:31 AM

CORROSION INHIBITORS FOR THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
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Alexi7
All-Star Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Jun 15, 2013 2:06:21 AM

I for one am enjoying record high corn prices. And, at the same time, I'm seeing E-85 sell for $2.759, while regular unleaded is almost $1 more per gallon here in NW Ohio.

I can recall corn selling for under $2.00/bushel, even with a cob premium. So, yeah, bring on $6 corn!

I'd have to hit close to 35 mpg in my '09 G6(3.5L V-6)to make regular unleaded cost effective. I get about 24-25 mpg with E-85 and 28-29 mpg with regular.
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borsht
Champion Author Oakland

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Message Posted: Jun 14, 2013 11:02:48 AM

goldseeker
Could you explain how gasoline causes corrosion?
Per Wikipedia,"In the most common use of the word, this means electrochemical oxidation of metals in reaction with an oxidant such as oxygen. Rusting, the formation of iron oxides, is a well-known example of electrochemical corrosion. This type of damage typically produces oxide(s) or salt(s) of the original metal. Corrosion can also occur in materials other than metals, such as ceramics or polymers, although in this context, the term degradation is more common. Corrosion degrades the useful properties of materials and structures including strength, appearance and permeability to liquids and gases."
since gasoline has no oxygen, is non-polar and is non-ionic, how can it be corrosive?
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Jun 13, 2013 5:14:29 PM

This is the same old anti-ethanol rhetoric that is drudged up every year by the oil companies and the anti-ethanol crowd.

There was no credibility then and there is no credibility now. Back in the mid 80s I lived in central Illinois. I had a 77 Ford pickup that I routinely drove back and forth in Iowa and Nebraska. I would fill up every chance I would get with gasohol. And I never had any problems. I also had a 67 Cougar that ran quite well on ethanol.

I now have a 81 Ranger that only uses e10.

Corrosion? Why do you suppose ethanol companies add corrosion inhibitors to ethanol? Would you believe for the same reason refiners add corrosion inhibitors to gasoline. And by the way, if you will check on your anti-freeze you will see that it has corrosion inhibitors also.

Actually if you live where there is snow you are much more likely to have rust and/or corrosion on you gas tank and fuels lines due to salt being applied to our highways than you are with ethanol fuels.

Now what about Rubber and other polymer compatibility.If you want to site a non-credible source such as Eric or Borsht, that is your choice. In the meantime I will stick with the real experts.

[Edited by: goldseeker at 6/13/2013 5:16:08 PM EST]
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WhiskeyBurner
Veteran Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Jun 13, 2013 12:02:34 PM

Tread lightly herd folks, cow pasture land mines ahead!
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borsht
Champion Author Oakland

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Message Posted: Jun 13, 2013 10:09:18 AM

The problem is the old carburetor, and it is nearly impossible to be build them now. The parts for rebuild don't exist anymore. So ethanol really is the death pill. One could buy after market carburetors, but the emission laws won't allow one to replace the carburetor with a non-original equipment carburetors. IMO There will not be classic cars from the 1980's, with the existing laws.
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