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CORNHICK

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Omaha

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 5:56:29 AM

Ok so here is what I need help with! I have a 2000 Chevrolet Impala 3.4 liter V6 motor. I am wondering should I use straight gasoline without ethanol which is 87 octane. Or should I use 10% ethanol gasoline with 89 octane in it. I am trying to keep this car as long as possible because I am a broke college student. The 87 octane fuel w/o ethanol costs 12c more per gallon. I was wondering is ethanol more corrosive, I have heard it is and it isn't I have also heard it is better because it keeps the motor cleaner. Please tell me what I need to know thank-you!! I am pretty confused on this whole topic I have been trying to figure it out since I first turned 16 and I am almost now 21!! Thank you for your time!!
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printedpandapaw
Rookie Author San Bernardino

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Message Posted: Mar 5, 2013 12:36:29 PM

87
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skh150
Sophomore Author Denver

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Message Posted: Jan 9, 2013 1:52:05 PM

uuuhhh yep
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SoylentGrain
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Jan 7, 2013 8:55:26 AM

"But if you have a valuable classic car, it is safest to stick with the gasoline it was designed for."

Doesn't make any difference if the fuel is "hydroscopic", as you say, or not. Water, usually, enters a fuel tank due to temperature hanges. Drain the tank for storage.
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Jan 7, 2013 1:35:49 AM

tdioiler thanks i will stick with the 87 fuel
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octane200
Rookie Author Oakland

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Message Posted: Jan 6, 2013 11:28:47 AM

Hello CORNHICK , Don't worry too much about being confused on the complexity of using ethanol. Most everyone appears to be including myself.
First off, unless something is designed for particular fuel, you should expect some probllems with it. Ethanol is hydroscopic, so it will absorb moisture. The moisture can be a catalyst for corrosian. I don't thinkg 10% ethanol by itself is corrosive to iron or steel. It might be to aluminum.
Chevron has done lots of research on all the common fuel mixtures.
But if you have a valuable classic car, it is safest to stick with the gasoline it was designed for.
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tdioiler
Champion Author Detroit

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Message Posted: Jan 6, 2013 10:55:56 AM

No more than 10% should keep the corrosion at bay if you are running the vehicle every day or so. If you let the car sit for a week (assume your a student that doesn't drive everyday) you should stick with straight 87.
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Jan 6, 2013 12:56:16 AM

three 87's in a row i think i will stick with the 87 thanks everyone
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ranger1169
Champion Author Harrisburg

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Message Posted: Jan 5, 2013 1:24:07 PM

87
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ggg452
Champion Author Manitoba

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Message Posted: Dec 24, 2012 1:15:24 PM

regular 87 all the way...
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Mr1lung
Champion Author Phoenix

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Message Posted: Dec 23, 2012 2:11:25 PM

reg 87
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krzysiek_ck
Champion Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Dec 23, 2012 9:30:59 AM

borsht wrote: "ethanol can be hard on aluminum. It's primary issue is the elastomers used in your fuel system" "Since Ethanol is hydroscopic it remove moisture from anything it can. Thus lots of the older seals become dry and brittle."

If you look up any Rubber, AKA elastomer, Chemical Resistance Charts you will learn that you got it backwards. The common chemicals in gasoline like: Benzene, Naphthalene, Toluene, and Xylene are very bad for rubber, while Ethanol is compatible with different types of rubber.
You can thank chemicals in gasoline for your "dry and brittle" "older seals".

Example - Rubber Chemical Resistance Chart

Ethanol is also rated "Good" for its chemical compatibility with Aluminum.

Material Selected: Aluminum
Chemical: Ethanol
Compatibility: B-Good

Chemical Compatibility Database
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Dec 23, 2012 6:59:46 AM

And yet those of use that used E10 in 1976 model cars as far back as 1981 somehow had no problems with damage.
Come on, if you haven't figured it out by now, after over 30 years, give it up, you never will figure it out.
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borsht
Champion Author Oakland

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Message Posted: Dec 22, 2012 11:38:50 PM

ethanol can be hard on aluminum. It's primary issue is the elastomers used in your fuel system,
http://www.fuel-testers.com/ethanol_problems_damage.html
Since Ethanol is hydroscopic it remove moisture from anything it can.
Thus lots of the older seals become dry and brittle.
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Dec 22, 2012 6:59:49 PM

dg steven thanks man
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dgsteven
Champion Author Los Angeles

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Message Posted: Dec 22, 2012 3:31:04 AM

keep the reg 87
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Dec 21, 2012 11:20:34 PM

Mertieman to your comment about where can you find gas with atleast a octane rating of 87 without ethanol you can get it in omaha ne for 12c more per gallon
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Dec 21, 2012 11:17:28 PM

huskers8780 thanks
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MertieMan
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Dec 21, 2012 7:57:30 AM

The gasoline currently on the market will not hurt the engine in that car and you cannot find ethanol free gas to my knowledge.
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05FLHRI
Champion Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Dec 21, 2012 7:14:52 AM

reg 87
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huskers8780
Rookie Author Nebraska

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Message Posted: Dec 13, 2012 5:45:56 PM

use regular 87 . only cost you $2.50 dollars more in a 25 gallon take to use 87 than 89. and it will be better on your car in long run.

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MikeCapeCoral
Champion Author Cape Coral

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Message Posted: Dec 13, 2012 1:35:32 AM

Marathon has started selling R90. Recreational gas with no ethanol at 90 octane.
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jack4141
Champion Author Alabama

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Message Posted: Dec 12, 2012 1:31:42 AM

...
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2amy
Champion Author Fresno

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Message Posted: Dec 11, 2012 6:31:40 PM

Your going to have to stay away from these new fuels. They dont have the umph that you need. Check your owners manual to see what octane you can safely run.
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13Octane
Champion Author Tucson

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Message Posted: Dec 11, 2012 11:57:52 AM

my advise is simple... consult a certified mechanic who has experience with this sort of topic.
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RRBC
Champion Author Victoria

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Message Posted: Dec 9, 2012 4:28:05 PM

Keep trying.
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repseng
Sophomore Author Twin Cities

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2012 2:13:55 PM

K
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MertieMan
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2012 5:35:45 AM

I would like to know exactly where you get ethanol free gas even with 87 octane?
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Sep 6, 2012 8:00:32 AM

Fascinating stuff. An entire fuel system replacement on a 43 year old car?

Sounds like an incredibly good parts saleman was involved. Could the problem have been the 'corrosive effects' actually loosened up decades of collected particles and let them finally slide through the system?

With the extent of parts replaced, I'm surprised that the transmission, timing chain, and turn signals all didn't fall prey to the shock of 'this junk'.

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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Sep 6, 2012 5:58:15 AM

"I just had to replace the entire fuel system, from tank to carburetor, on my '69 Dodge due to the corrosive effects of this junk."

Right, old age had nothing to do with it. That is why there are no junkyards with rusting hulks, everything lasts forever! LOL!!
Fuel tanks are exposed under the vehicle. Most of them rust out from road salt, or are damaged by rocks, bottoming out, or various other causes. And they have been making replacement tanks a lot longer than they have been making ethanol.
And if you hadn't rebuilt or replaced the carburetor on a 1969 vehicle by now, it had to have been running pretty badly for a long time, there was no way the original float wasn't saturated many years back.
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 6, 2012 4:55:50 AM

"I just had to replace the entire fuel system, from tank to carburetor, on my '69 Dodge due to the corrosive effects of this junk. Plus my standby electric generator has started to leak fuel due to cracked rubber seals."

And what makes you think that ethanol caused this problem? It is a well known fact that there are other common components of gasoline that causes breakdown of gaskets, seals, and fuel system.
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WEPSMAN
Champion Author South Dakota

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Message Posted: Sep 4, 2012 9:06:47 AM

I run E10 in both my cars. They both have over 70,000 on them and have not had any issues.
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forresj
Champion Author Wilmington

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Message Posted: Aug 30, 2012 9:06:28 AM

Ethanol, also called ethyl alcohol, pure alcohol, grain alcohol, or drinking alcohol, is a volatile, flammable, colorless liquid. In fact, ethanol will dissolve build up carbon as it burns, so the end result is a clean engine. Ethanol also attracts water so it will remove water from your gas tank during condensation in the winter months. E10 is fine for your typical vehicle. You should only be concerned if concentration of ethanol is greater than 10% (E10). Since Ethanol attracts water, you get a greater chance of contaminating engine oil during blow-by. Blow-by occurs when the explosion that occurs in your engine's combustion chamber causes fuel, air and moisture to be forced past the rings into the crankcase. When oil is contaminated with water, oil breaksdown quicker and will cause corrosion to engine parts. Blow-by is usually accentuated during engine acceleration.

Engines with bad piston rings will experience more blow-by. Nowadays, blow-by is remedied with the PCV system (positive crankcase ventilation). At a certain pressure, the PCV valve releases fumes back into the engine combustion chamber to be reburned. A PCV valve should be replaced every 15 to 60 thousand miles depending on the make and engine you have. A PCV valve is cheap to replace (usually less than $1) so make sure it is working fine.

One way to prevent water contamination in your gas is to keep your tank full to avoid moisture absorption from the air inside the gas tank. Make sure your gas tank tightly sealed from the outside air.

Advantages:

Domestically produced, reducing use of imported petroleum
Lower emissions of air pollutants
More resistant to engine knock (higher octane rating)
Added vehicle cost is very small
Non-toxic, biodegradable
Cleans combustion chamber

Disadvantages:

Can only be used in flex-fuel vehicles
Lower energy content, resulting in fewer miles per gallon
Limited availability
Currently expensive to produce


[Edited by: forresj at 8/30/2012 9:11:50 AM EST]
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Bill G.
Champion Author Hartford

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Message Posted: Aug 30, 2012 6:57:52 AM


My recent experience with E10 has been poor. And we have no choice, it is all that is sold in gas stations in Connecticut.

I just had to replace the entire fuel system, from tank to carburetor, on my '69 Dodge due to the corrosive effects of this junk. Plus my standby electric generator has started to leak fuel due to cracked rubber seals.

If I had a choice, I would not use E10. Other bad thing is that it reduces MPGs. Who needs that these days?
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Aug 27, 2012 1:48:46 AM

You and your mechanic need to go back to school.
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Aug 27, 2012 1:47:32 AM

Cornhick, your test is flawed. It does not burn faster. And explain to me how it burns hotter since it has considerably less btus?
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goldseeker
Champion Author West Virginia

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Message Posted: Aug 27, 2012 1:47:31 AM

Cornhick, your test is flawed. It does not burn faster. And explain to me how it burns hotter since it has considerably less btus?
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Aug 27, 2012 1:20:33 AM

for sure I don't like ethanol it is a joke if you ask me my mechanic told me it burns hotter and I did a fuel burn test and he was right the ethanol gas burns a lot hotter and a lot faster. I did the test in a beaker type pyrex bowl thing.
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Aug 24, 2012 10:27:45 PM

Crapulent you say your car has 400,000 miles on it? Maybe ethanol is bad I have heard it can attract water into the fuel and cause phase seperation? Have you heard of that before just curious. THanks for your help
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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Aug 9, 2012 8:43:32 AM

Yes I apologize for me being so arrogant. I am sorry everyone
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Aug 9, 2012 8:01:16 AM

Nice move CORNHICK. A bit hard to do but I think you've gone a long way to fill in the hole you dug for yourself. I expect that you have also impressed more than a few people with your simple words.

We have many "experienced" contributors here and you'll discover that they offer insights that can only come with the miles and years they have collected so a level of respect for their contributions is absolutely necessary.

With a lot of luck, you will be with us long enough to become one of the multi-millionaire point contributors out there and offer the wisdom that can only come from gathered experience and also the effort to try to help others by passing on what you have learned. Good luck out there.

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CORNHICK
All-Star Author Omaha

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 11:56:31 PM

rumbleseat sorry that I was rude to you I will take your advice and start using e-10
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reb4
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 4:23:44 PM

cornhick, I would be more concerned about getting quality fuel for the 2000 Chevy Impala (or any vehicle for that matter). What is the recommended fuel for the vehicle. Should be able to find that out from a forum...
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SilverStreaker
Champion Author Twin Cities

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 9:36:56 AM

If you're a college student, then you should know that doing research is much better than relying on the opinions of others. Start with whether ethanol is more corrosive to 2000 era automobile parts than gasoline. Then research whether gasoline and ethanol blends have corrosion inhibitors. I think you'll learn that you will be wasting 12c per gallon if you buy the 87 octane fuel.
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 6:49:42 AM

Mind you, you are the 21 year old that tried to tell me I don't know a thing about engines, so you won't pay attention to my experienc anyway.
I have been driving more than twice as many years as you have been alive, and have probably spent more time servicing automobiles, my own, my dad's, my brother's, and my wife's than you have spent behind the wheel.
I have been using E10 in various automobiles since 1981, every regular pump in Manitoba is E10, but, yeah, what would I know?
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rumbleseat
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Aug 8, 2012 6:35:58 AM

Well, the 1976 Valiant I inherited from an aunt lasted a LONG time, had no problem with E10, and the engine never suffered damage, was never touched other than oil changes and tune-ups in over 25 years.
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