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Author Topic: Car Trivia Game, Answer One, Ask One Back to Topics
Hambone61
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Message Posted: Dec 21, 2006 11:53:40 PM

This could be fun!

ASK an automotive trivia question... AFTER you have answered the question above your post. Incorrect posts can be challenged, politely!

BE SURE YOU KNOW THE CORRECT ANSWER TO THE QUESTION YOU ARE ASKING. Revisit this thread to see if your question was correctly answered, if not, enter a challenge. Try not to make it too difficult so all can participate..... I'll get it started.

Question:
NAME THE MODEL YEAR Chevrolet marketed their first Bel Air model.
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 31, 2015 1:46:51 PM

A nice, fat Robusto for the man!

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bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 30, 2015 10:45:57 PM

Twin Ultramatic was Packard's automatic transmission on its 1955 and 1956 models, which featured both low and high driving ranges, not unlike the Dual-Range Hydra-Matic on contemporary Pontiacs (of course by then it was called Strato-Flight Hydra-Matic). It also used electric pushbutton controls, unlike the mechanical controls used on 1956 Chrysler products.
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 30, 2015 2:31:36 PM

What was a Twin Ultramatic?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 27, 2015 7:41:55 PM

Liquamatic didn't work, but the answer did! Next question!
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 26, 2015 2:45:51 PM

I wonder what would have developed in transmissions if WWII did not happen when it did...the Liquamatic Drive was used on Lincoln and Mercury for 1942, and used vacuum cylinders and assorted widgets to work.
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 26, 2015 10:33:38 AM

While 1942 went down in history as the year the assembly lines shut down for the war...it was also the year that an "automatic" transmission debuted in Lincoln and Mercury automobiles. Name it.
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 25, 2015 1:56:03 PM

Yes, Bongobro, bumpers were not affected, and also windshield wipers!

Got the next Q?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 25, 2015 1:38:05 PM

A "blackout special" was any automobile built between late December 1941 and the end of the 1942 model year, in February 1942. After Pearl Harbor, the federal government ordered car makers to stop using chrome-plated parts to conserve chromium for the war effort--although, oddly enough, not for bumpers on passenger cars. (I have heard that some companies painted over chrome trim on cars so, according to the stories I've read, their cars would not have a sales advantage over models that didn't. But I don't buy that story.) Any unsold '42 models were dribbled out a few at a time to high-priority buyers--those who needed them most--during 1943, '44, and '45.)
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 24, 2015 1:31:29 PM

What was a blackout special?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 22, 2015 11:13:49 AM

Illinois was the one! Many years ago, I read in an issue of Ford Times (the old Ford dealer's magazine) that Illinis authorities quickly discovered that cows liked to snack on the plates, so--for 1944--they reverted to metal plates. (In Missouri, they used paper stickers.)
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 21, 2015 11:24:43 PM

There was more than one state to issue such plates, but I think Illinois was the first in 1943
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 19, 2015 2:56:31 PM

During World War II, state and local governments contributed to the conservation effort in numerous imaginative ways. In one state, however, cows enjoyed an unexpected snack when soybeans were used to make license plates. Which one (this should be a little easier, since you have only 48 to choose from!)?
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 19, 2015 1:28:08 PM

Right on, Bongobro!Your turn.
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 18, 2015 7:56:52 PM

Founded just after the start of American involvement in World War II, the Victory Service League was formed by Chevrolet Motor Division and local Chevy dealers to encourage community support and participation in such things as the USO...the Office of War Information...the War Production Board...and, not surprisingly, encouraging the maintenance and repair--and the conservation--of the milions of cars and trucks that were in use "for the duration."
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 15, 2015 7:11:45 PM

What was the Victory Service League, and what was its purpose?
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 15, 2015 5:07:19 AM

Keerrrrrrect !!!
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 14, 2015 1:19:21 PM

New York, in 1903
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 14, 2015 4:35:02 AM

What was the first state to require number plates?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 13, 2015 8:12:47 PM

Okay! I stand corrected, boxdriver...and I was not aware that Kaiser-Frazer had beaten Chevrolet to the punch on that one! Until now, of course....

Hit us with your next question!
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 13, 2015 4:51:55 AM

Contrary to what many might think, the first fiberglass-bodied American sports car was not the Corvette, it was the Kaiser-Darrin. The car was first announced on September 26, 1952 and initial prototypes were shown on February 22, 1953.
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 12, 2015 8:55:50 PM

Before you throw out the next question, wouldn't the Chevrolet Corvette follow the Woodill Wildfire and precede the Kaiser-Darrin? The first 'Vette was built on June 30, 1953...with a total production of 300 for the 1953 model...and was the first fiberglass-bodied sports car to go into volume production.

After the initial production run in Flint, Michigan, Corvette production moved to St. Louis in 1954 and continued there until 1981.
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Mar 12, 2015 5:53:53 PM

Correct!

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box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 12, 2015 3:45:21 AM

1954 Kaiser-Darrin: America's First Fiberglass Sports Car ... The 161 cubic inch 6 -cylinder in-line side-valve engine produced 90 horsepower.
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 10, 2015 6:28:30 PM

OK, apart from the Woodill Wildfire, what was the next production American fiberglass bodied sports car?
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 10, 2015 4:51:44 AM

that answer gives you the right to ask the next question
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 9, 2015 6:02:58 PM

1925 Ford Model T
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 8, 2015 4:57:42 AM

What was the year and make of the first factory produced pick-up?
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 5, 2015 9:25:24 PM

Boxdriver, you are correct in that the Woodill Wildfire was first seen in 1952...however, I don't know if 300 cars produced in the entire model run of the car qualifies as "production". However, you may ask the next question, and anyone having the answer to the previous Q may answer that one.
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

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Message Posted: Mar 5, 2015 4:38:50 AM

The Woodill Wildfire was first seen at the November 1952 Motorama in Los Angeles
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Mar 4, 2015 11:50:37 PM

What was the first production fiberglass American sportscar made?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 3, 2015 2:36:41 PM

Good job, ms! Hard to believe the original Kaiser 226 engine was basically an industrial engine adapted for autmotive use...and the Kaiser was the first supercharged engine in use in modern automobiles (at least post-war!)...

Next question!
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Mar 3, 2015 12:14:36 PM

Kaiser advertised the Manhattan in this manner. Its thrifty low displacement engine was supercharged to give "economical cruising, plus breath-taking Super-power for the fastest acceleration you ever felt".
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Mar 2, 2015 7:48:32 PM

"Drive with Power on Demand!" So proclaimed 1954 ads announcing an advancement in what make of car? (Bonus: Name the make of car AND the advancement!)
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2015 1:28:52 PM

Yes, it was! During WWII, Buick made tank destroyers. Called the Hellcat, this destroyer had the earliest Dynaflow transmission, and was the proving ground for later versions.

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bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 26, 2015 12:27:49 PM

??? I know Buick and Oldsmobile used a Fluid-Drivish semi-automatic called the Automatic Safety Transmission in 1937 and 1938...but that's not the Dynaflow principle! Was it used in some kind of military vehicle?
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Feb 26, 2015 12:11:23 PM

Good try, but there was a vehicle that used the Dynaflow transmission before the 1948 Buick.
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 25, 2015 6:05:06 PM

Buick, starting with an optional Dynaflow on Roadmasters and Supers in 1948, then extending it to Specials with the 1950 models. (It became standard on Roadmasters for 1949.)
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Feb 24, 2015 1:25:28 PM

Which vehicle was the first to use the Dynaflow transmission, and in what year?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 23, 2015 12:07:32 PM

Bingo! Of course, you seem to be the Chrysler expert in this forum...next question, please!
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Feb 22, 2015 7:21:16 PM

Dodge, with its Fluid Drive transmission, was so advertised, as jerky shifting was eliminated
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 22, 2015 12:11:48 PM

Dring the late 1940s, which make of car boasted that it was "the smoothest car afloat"? Bonus: Why could it be justified in making that claim?
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2015 12:41:33 PM

Aha! Another robusto for Bongobro!

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bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2015 9:14:59 AM

OOPS!!! FORD adopted it in 1951, when the first Fordomatic was introduced. "Shift to Fordomatic and you'll never shift again," said the ads!
mullingspices
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Message Posted: Feb 18, 2015 5:07:49 PM

Yes, but when did Ford adopt the shift pattern?

[Edited by: mullingspices at 2/18/2015 5:07:59 PM EST]
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 18, 2015 3:02:56 PM

P-R-N-Dr-Lo...which ultimately became the standardized shift-quadrant pattern on all cars in the 1965 model year...because the federal government liked the idea of a standardized shift quadrant so one wouldn;t be confused switching from, say, a Ford to a Chevrolet....
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Feb 17, 2015 8:42:03 PM

The new Hydra-Matic transmissions indeed had the Park position in 1956, making the gear selector read PNDLR. How did Ford's Ford-O-Matic read in 1956, and when did it start reading that way?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 14, 2015 5:19:30 PM

You know, ms, when I wrote that question, I realized there were two possible correct answers...and you got them both! The one I was most interested in was the fact that such Hydra-Matics had, for the first time ever, a "Park" position (previously you had to put the gearshift into "Reverse" gear to park the car.)

But, as the 1956 Oldsmobile advertising put it, the new Jetaway Hydra-Matic had "all the flow of fluid" (the fluid coupling) and "all the go of gears" (it was still a four-speed transmission) which made, as they put it, for livelier acceleration and greater performance.

Nash advertising, calling it "Flash-Away Hydra-Matic," promised "whip-quick acceleration" when teamed with the new AMC V-8...and 1957 Pontiacs equipped with "Strato-Flight Hydra-Matic offered "thrilling performance" from "the world's most modern automatic transmission."

I'd say ya nailed it! Next question!
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Feb 12, 2015 12:37:29 PM

I think this is what you're looking for...

a small fluid coupling was added between the front and rear planetary gearsets, which allowed for smoother shifts and less creep at a stop.OR, was it the Park position?

[Edited by: mullingspices at 2/12/2015 12:41:10 PM EST]
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 10, 2015 7:37:22 PM

Beginning with the 1956 model year, automobiles (and trucks) equipped with the Jetaway/Strato-Flight/Flash-Away Hydra-Matic transmission had a feature that previous Hydra-Matics never had before. What was it?
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

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Message Posted: Feb 8, 2015 6:15:11 PM

Another cigar for your humidor! Next Q?
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: Feb 7, 2015 2:37:15 PM

August 5, 1914 at the intersection of Euclid and East 105th Street in Cleveland, Ohio. Nuff said!
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