Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    12:02 PM

Message Forum - Read Message

Category: Games & Trivia > Topics Add to favorite topics   Post new topicPost New Topic
Author Topic: Car Trivia Game, Answer One, Ask One Back to Topics
Hambone61

Champion Author
Oregon

Posts:14,875
Points:2,620,060
Joined:Sep 2005
Message Posted: Dec 21, 2006 11:53:40 PM

This could be fun!

ASK an automotive trivia question... AFTER you have answered the question above your post. Incorrect posts can be challenged, politely!

BE SURE YOU KNOW THE CORRECT ANSWER TO THE QUESTION YOU ARE ASKING. Revisit this thread to see if your question was correctly answered, if not, enter a challenge. Try not to make it too difficult so all can participate..... I'll get it started.

Question:
NAME THE MODEL YEAR Chevrolet marketed their first Bel Air model.
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Apr 27, 2015 4:49:23 AM

I agree with Bongobro,you have the right to ask the next question
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 26, 2015 10:54:58 PM

Zut alors! I am impressed! My French is pretty bad, but I notice with some amusement that "La Jamais Contente" roughly translates to "(The) Never Content." Sort of like the Lexus of its day, as in "the relentless pursuit of perfection."

Why don't you throw out the next question, ms, then I'll throw my next one out afterward?
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 26, 2015 10:25:01 PM

La Jamais Contente, April 29, 1899 (or May 1), near Paris, driven by Camille Jenatzy
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Apr 26, 2015 4:55:43 AM

Name the first car to officially crack the 60 MPH barrier
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 23, 2015 2:20:41 PM

box driver and bongobro, you are both correct! While the Y-Job was experimental, both Cord and DeSoto were production cars.

Since box driver answered first, it's his turn.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 23, 2015 9:44:56 AM

Hoo boy, we may have to flip a coin! The Buick Y-Job was an experimental styling car devised by the legendary Harley Earl, and the Cord 810/812 was a legend itself in the late '30s...but the 1942 DeSoto also offered retractable "Airfoil" headlights ("out of sight except at night," so claimed the ads).
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Apr 23, 2015 4:50:37 AM

The Buick Y-Job and the Cord
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 22, 2015 6:55:21 PM

I know of at least 2 cars made before WWII that had hidden headlights. Name one.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 21, 2015 10:55:27 AM

That's one of the two correct answers, ms!

The DeSoto Suburban was basically the seven-passenger sedan with some rejiggering of the seats. The second seat was basically another two-door sedan seat, enabling the second seat to be slid forward for cargo or backward for comfort. Two folding third seats enabled you to seat up to nine passengers.

The other Suburban was built by Nash. It was a four-door fastback ("slipstream" in Nash-speak) sedan with wood-framed doors and deck lid, much like the Chrysler Town and Country sedan. 1,000 were sold over a three-year period between 1946 and 1948.

Next question, please!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 20, 2015 1:31:40 PM

DeSoto made a sedan called "suburban"
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 19, 2015 11:04:20 PM

While the term "suburban" refers usually to a station wagon, at least one car maker offered a model called "Suburban" that had nothing to do with station wagons. Name either one.
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 19, 2015 7:00:21 PM

Good answer! I remember a friend had an Olds, and we tried to get a starter for it. The parts people all came up with the same part that obviously wouldn't fit. I got this parts girl who was really sharp to look at the old starter, and she found the correct one, which belonged to a Buick! BTW, he had purchased this car brand new from the factory as a special order car, and had picked it up in Las Vegas before it was even prepped, so I know no one messed with changing the engine!

Next Q?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 18, 2015 9:27:31 PM

It referred (at least until 1977!) to the Oldsmobile-designed overhead-valve V-8 introduced in the 88 and 98 models for 1949. One of the many tie-ins with the "Rocket" name was a slogan used in 1950: "Make a date with a Rocket 8!" The 1965 Oldsmobiles used the phrase "The Rocket Action Cars," and the following year's slogan expanded on that: "The Rocket Action Cars Are Out in Front Again for 1966!"

Trouble was the "Rocket" image was so firmly ingrained with Oldsmobiles--and Oldsmobile engines--that when GM began building Oldsmobiles with Chevrolet 350 V-8s, at least one disgruntled customer sued GM for misleading advertising, which led to the immortal disclaimer still used by all GM divisions: "Oldsmobiles are built with engines manufactured by various divisions of General Motors or worldwide suppliers to General Motors."

No matter that Chrysler and Ford had used corporate engines in all their products for many years before--and after!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 2:21:51 PM

In the post WWII years, Oldsmobile often used the name "Rocket" on its cars. What does this refer to?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 15, 2015 6:25:23 PM

Very good! While Oldsmobile used the V-6 in some '64 and '65 F-85 models (as "the Econo-Way V-6"), Buick sold the tooling to Kaiser Jeep to use in the Jeep Universal (CJ-5). The short-lived Tornado OHC engine would not fit under the hood of the CJ models...so the "Dauntless" V-6 was a popular option on the Tuxedo Park Mark IV and regular CJs, too.

Buick bought back the tooling in 1975 (after sharing the Chevy 250 six for several years) to be reworked into the 3800 V-6. In fact, they found an early V-6 in a junkyard Special and put it under the hood of a Buick Apollo to prove it would have enough oomph to power Buicks of the future.

And it did, including Apollos, Skylarks, Regals, and even the 1975 B-body LeSabre!

Your turn!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 1:21:07 PM

I think you're getting at the Jeep. Buick switched to the Chevrolet 6 for a few years, determining its V6 was no longer needed. The design was sold to Kaiser Jeep, but after a few years Buick wanted it back. However, Kaiser Jeep was out of business by that time, having been sold to AMC, who sold it back to GM...
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 10:47:47 AM

Continuing the Buick theme for this round: Another make of vehicle used the Buick V-6 engine in its lines for several years before the V-6 reappeared in the 1975 Skyhawk (among others!).

Which make...and why?
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 9, 2015 1:30:39 PM

Great answer! I was thinking about the 36, but the 61 fits the bill, too!

Next Q?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 8, 2015 5:13:24 PM

Which you would prefer? The 1936 Special, a/k/a Series 40, or the 1961 Special, one of the "senior compacts" which shared its body with the Oldsmobile F-85 and Pontiac Tempest (and was a modified version of the Chevy Corvair platform)?

Either way they were impressive.

The 1936 Special was a smash hit, as were all of the 1936 models, which were the first Buicks to use the traditional model names we've known and loved for years (Special, Super, Century, Roadmaster and Limited). Clever marketing moves made the early Special particularly attractive to car buyers who thought Buicks were too rich for their blood. And considering Buick was thisclose to being discontinued for good in 1935, the new models were indeed a major breakthrough!

The 1961 Special introduced an aluminum-block 215-cubic-inch V8 which was shared by the F-85, and to a lesser extent, as an option on 1961-62 Tempests. This was the engine that was used for many years, with modifications and upgrades, for the Rover 3.5 luxury sedan in England, AND adapted with an iron block as the 198-cubic-inch V-6 debuting in the 1962 Special. And variations of this engine was used well into the 1990s in all sorts of Buicks and other GM vehicles!

As the 1961 introductory ad campaign put it, for either model, the "special-size" Buick Special was "the best of both worlds."
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 7, 2015 1:45:04 PM

When was the Buick Special introduced, and what made it "special"?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 5, 2015 11:53:03 PM

Right on target. ms! Next question, please!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 5, 2015 5:37:02 PM

Oldsmobile joined forces with Tiffany's to produce a limited edition Ninety-Eight Regency. This car came in Tiffany gold with a choice of 3 colors for its vinyl top. They had a special interior more luxurious than any previous Olds, and featured a Tiffany clock. This model was created for Oldsmobile's 75th anniversary.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 4, 2015 6:52:16 PM

In 1972, the famous New York jewelry firm Tiffany & Co. joined forces with which auto brand for a special edition model?
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 4, 2015 12:42:39 PM

That's right! Interesting how Chrysler was both early and late in the game.

Your turn, bongobro.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 3, 2015 7:13:37 PM

Dodge. with the original Challenger in 1970. The 1970 Challenger, based on the revised Barracuda, provided the styling cues for the most recent generation of Challengers!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 3, 2015 2:50:10 PM

Which car make was the last to introduce the pony car ?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 2, 2015 11:46:55 AM

The joke turned out to be on Plymouth, because sixteen days later Ford Motor Company introduced a certain little car called the Mustang. Ironically, while Ford built the Mustang on the platform of the "dowdy" Falcon, Ford never mentioned any relation between the two in Mustang marketing. All you had to do to identify a relationship between the Barracuda and its parent car was to look at the lower-right-rear of the car, just above the bumper, where Plymouth put the "Valiant" nameplate.

(Curiously, in other parts of the world where the Barracuda was sold, it was marketed AS the "Valiant Barracuda.")

Next question!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Apr 1, 2015 1:41:46 PM

Plymouth Barracuda
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Apr 1, 2015 12:50:25 PM

What new car was introduced (no foolin') on April 1, 1964?
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 31, 2015 1:46:51 PM

A nice, fat Robusto for the man!

Next Q?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 30, 2015 10:45:57 PM

Twin Ultramatic was Packard's automatic transmission on its 1955 and 1956 models, which featured both low and high driving ranges, not unlike the Dual-Range Hydra-Matic on contemporary Pontiacs (of course by then it was called Strato-Flight Hydra-Matic). It also used electric pushbutton controls, unlike the mechanical controls used on 1956 Chrysler products.
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 30, 2015 2:31:36 PM

What was a Twin Ultramatic?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 27, 2015 7:41:55 PM

Liquamatic didn't work, but the answer did! Next question!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 26, 2015 2:45:51 PM

I wonder what would have developed in transmissions if WWII did not happen when it did...the Liquamatic Drive was used on Lincoln and Mercury for 1942, and used vacuum cylinders and assorted widgets to work.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 26, 2015 10:33:38 AM

While 1942 went down in history as the year the assembly lines shut down for the war...it was also the year that an "automatic" transmission debuted in Lincoln and Mercury automobiles. Name it.
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 25, 2015 1:56:03 PM

Yes, Bongobro, bumpers were not affected, and also windshield wipers!

Got the next Q?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 25, 2015 1:38:05 PM

A "blackout special" was any automobile built between late December 1941 and the end of the 1942 model year, in February 1942. After Pearl Harbor, the federal government ordered car makers to stop using chrome-plated parts to conserve chromium for the war effort--although, oddly enough, not for bumpers on passenger cars. (I have heard that some companies painted over chrome trim on cars so, according to the stories I've read, their cars would not have a sales advantage over models that didn't. But I don't buy that story.) Any unsold '42 models were dribbled out a few at a time to high-priority buyers--those who needed them most--during 1943, '44, and '45.)
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 24, 2015 1:31:29 PM

What was a blackout special?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 22, 2015 11:13:49 AM

Illinois was the one! Many years ago, I read in an issue of Ford Times (the old Ford dealer's magazine) that Illinis authorities quickly discovered that cows liked to snack on the plates, so--for 1944--they reverted to metal plates. (In Missouri, they used paper stickers.)
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 21, 2015 11:24:43 PM

There was more than one state to issue such plates, but I think Illinois was the first in 1943
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 19, 2015 2:56:31 PM

During World War II, state and local governments contributed to the conservation effort in numerous imaginative ways. In one state, however, cows enjoyed an unexpected snack when soybeans were used to make license plates. Which one (this should be a little easier, since you have only 48 to choose from!)?
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 19, 2015 1:28:08 PM

Right on, Bongobro!Your turn.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 18, 2015 7:56:52 PM

Founded just after the start of American involvement in World War II, the Victory Service League was formed by Chevrolet Motor Division and local Chevy dealers to encourage community support and participation in such things as the USO...the Office of War Information...the War Production Board...and, not surprisingly, encouraging the maintenance and repair--and the conservation--of the milions of cars and trucks that were in use "for the duration."
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 15, 2015 7:11:45 PM

What was the Victory Service League, and what was its purpose?
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Mar 15, 2015 5:07:19 AM

Keerrrrrrect !!!
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 14, 2015 1:19:21 PM

New York, in 1903
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Mar 14, 2015 4:35:02 AM

What was the first state to require number plates?
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 13, 2015 8:12:47 PM

Okay! I stand corrected, boxdriver...and I was not aware that Kaiser-Frazer had beaten Chevrolet to the punch on that one! Until now, of course....

Hit us with your next question!
Profile Pic
box driver
Champion Author New Hampshire

Posts:21,165
Points:3,650,920
Joined:Feb 2005
Message Posted: Mar 13, 2015 4:51:55 AM

Contrary to what many might think, the first fiberglass-bodied American sports car was not the Corvette, it was the Kaiser-Darrin. The car was first announced on September 26, 1952 and initial prototypes were shown on February 22, 1953.
Profile Pic
bongobro
Champion Author St. Louis

Posts:20,392
Points:3,180,685
Joined:Mar 2005
Message Posted: Mar 12, 2015 8:55:50 PM

Before you throw out the next question, wouldn't the Chevrolet Corvette follow the Woodill Wildfire and precede the Kaiser-Darrin? The first 'Vette was built on June 30, 1953...with a total production of 300 for the 1953 model...and was the first fiberglass-bodied sports car to go into volume production.

After the initial production run in Flint, Michigan, Corvette production moved to St. Louis in 1954 and continued there until 1981.
Profile Pic
mullingspices
Champion Author Honolulu

Posts:14,309
Points:2,973,930
Joined:Apr 2007
Message Posted: Mar 12, 2015 5:53:53 PM

Correct!

Next Q?
Post a reply Back to Topics