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down2fumes

Champion Author
Jacksonville

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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 7:29:01 AM

Monitor the latest test results on ALL vehicles in regard to their fuel efficiency.

[Edited by: GM at 12/18/2012 11:13:52 AM EST]
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Gas_Buddy
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: Dec 19, 2012 1:49:42 PM



MsPeachi747:
“What is the difference between nitrogenic gasoline and non-nitrogenic gas?”

By nitrogenic gasoline, I assume you’re referring to gasoline sold at Shell stations.

First, there are essentially two groups of gasoline seekers: those who look for the lowest prices out there and those who want better performance from their fuel.

Second, all gas stations are required by the Environmental Protection Agency have to distribute gasoline that includes additives designed to clean essential engine parts.

Shell, four or five years ago began advertising (or at least publicizing) “special” kind of gasoline known as Shell Nitrogen Enriched Gasoline, and in early 2009 (if I remember correctly) began pumping this gasoline at its stations and emphasized the fuel's “formidable” cleaning power.

As fuel prices jumped around, often settling back down unexpectedly, many drivers looked for more efficient ways to use and conserve fuel. People can alter or improve their driving habits by observing local speed limits, and avoiding hard braking and rapid acceleration. Taking regular (or extra) care of the car’s engine is also important; common sense says the performance of your vehicle's engine is a big factor in fuel economy. A properly maintained, well-cared-for engine will provide better fuel efficiency. types of gas you use can affect your engine, too, and Shell would like you to think that its particular blend of gasoline will affect your engine positively.

A lengthy explanation will explain Shell’s nitrogen-enriched gasoline and what it calls (in its advertising) engine gunk, hopefully answering your question.

A gasoline engine generates power through internal combustion. During this process, a series of pistons compress and ignite a mixture of air and a high-energy fuel (like gasoline) in a very small space, creating the energy necessary to move your car forward. In very general terms, the amount of gasoline and air that ignites within your engine determines how much power your engine produces. A set of valves help regulate how much of the air and fuel mixture is allowed to enter the combustion chamber at the top of each cylinder. These valves act like small manhole covers that open and close at precisely the right times to allow the engine to cycle properly. Here's how it happens: One set of valves opens to allow the air and fuel mixture to flow into the combustion chamber, then the chamber is sealed while the volatile mixture is compressed and ignited. The final step is when a second set of valves opens to release the exhaust gasses from the chamber and then the whole process begins again. A rotating camshaft applies pressure to each valve when it's time to let fuel in and also when it's time to let the exhaust out. So, when you step on your gas pedal, you're technically controlling how much air and fuel those valves will let in. The valves, obviously, are an important part of your car's engine, and they're performance is integral to the overall performance of your car.

A major byproduct of combustion is carbon deposit build-up, or what Shell calls in ad campaign "gunk." Gunk is essentially what it sounds like -- it's black soot that can harden on the cylinders, pistons and valves of an engine. If too much collects, this gunk can negatively affect engine performance, causing your car to burn more oil, overheat and even burn gasoline less efficiently. Valves inside an engine are designed to let in a specific amount of air and fuel, and when this process is interrupted by carbon deposit build-up, your car won't be performing up to its potential.

So what does Shell's nitrogen-enriched gasoline have to do with this? The nitrogen formula in this specific type of gas functions as a detergent. Special detergents or additives are added to fuels to help clean engines. When Shell's nitrogen-enriched gasoline runs through your engine, it passes over and comes into contact with the system's valves. Shell claims that nitrogen-enriched molecules chemically react with carbon deposits that have collected on the valves. These nitrogen-enriched molecules then clean the valves and permit maximum gasoline and air compression within the cylinder.

So, to rephrase your question "What is the difference...", is Shell's nitrogen-enriched gasoline a big deal? Is it really something to get excited about? Shell certainly seems to think so. Shell's Web site has its own section dedicated to its nitrogen-enriched gasoline. The home page acts as a main lobby, with doors to rooms like the "Laboratory," the "Garage," the "Test Bay" and the "Lounge." You can click on any of these doors as you explore some information on Shell's product.

Shell's engine-cleaning gas isn't technically anything new, either, since all gasoline products have been required by the EPA to include a minimum amount of additives and detergents, however Shell's gasoline does meet and exceed TOP TIER Gasoline Detergent standards, which is a voluntary standard that several major automakers including Audi, BMW, General Motors, Honda, Toyota and Volkswagen created in order to improve the quality of gasoline.

Does that answer your question?
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Don
Moderator
Message Posted: Dec 19, 2012 1:13:00 PM

Hi down2fumes,

Thanks for your suggestion.

GasBuddy offers websites and mobile apps to help people compare gas prices through user-submitted information.

There are highly regarded sources where you can find test results for all vehicles and their fuel efficiency (such as the aforementioned FuelEconomy.gov.

We can take your suggestion into consideration, but it is a little outside the purpose of our sites/apps.

-Don
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MsPeachi747
Veteran Author Cleveland

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Message Posted: Dec 19, 2012 1:13:49 AM

What is the difference between nitrogenic gasoline and non-nitrogenic gas?
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maxstar
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 10:45:28 PM

sounds like Uncle Sam has got this one covered.
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Gas_Buddy
Champion Author Maryland

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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 9:58:09 PM

Add to the fact that there are over 1,000 different 2012 vehicles, and the information is already posted at:
Fuel Economy
and you've already paid for this information, it's hard to see what more you want.

Use the website and get your money's worth.
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CampKohler
Champion Author Sacramento

Posts:13,357
Points:2,126,240
Joined:May 2007
Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 9:21:23 PM

More information is needed.

We have no way of knowing whether or not someone at GB is already monitoring test results. Unless there is a further suggestion as to what GB should do with this info, we are not likely to have benefit of it.

[Edited by: CampKohler at 12/18/2012 9:24:26 PM EST]
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scoutmaster
Champion Author Pittsburgh

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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 3:05:16 PM

I guess a list of the top fuel efficient vehicles and their MPG would be nice but not really all that big of a necessity.
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Gas_Buddy
Champion Author Maryland

Posts:30,193
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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 1:41:17 PM

How do you propose that Gas Buddy "Monitor the latest test results on ALL vehicles in regard to their fuel efficiency.?

Are you suggesting that Gas Buddy conducts mileage testing and continually updatesitheir testing results?
Or are you suggesting that Gas Buddy copies the information available from the EPA and other testing organizations?

As for the topic name, "Track the most fuel efficient vehicles", this information is readily available with a simple internet search, although simply being the most fuel efficient vehicles doesn't necessarily mean they are the most appropriate vehicles for a person or family. Fuel efficiency should be only one of the concerns when buying a vehicle. Are you suggesting that Gas Buddy should also monitor other vehicle issues?

I guess my question is, why should Gas Buddy "Monitor the latest test results on ALL vehicles in regard to their fuel efficiency"?
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Scrapheap
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 10:49:16 AM

How does one monitor an electric car?
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scoutmaster
Champion Author Pittsburgh

Posts:99,047
Points:3,940,390
Joined:Mar 2003
Message Posted: Dec 18, 2012 9:04:33 AM

I' m wondering what benefit this would be to this site?
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