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taztug

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Message Posted: May 10, 2006 12:44:24 PM

On May 10th the following happend in the old west:

Tanscontinental Railroad
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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2014 9:58:38 AM

1957 "In God We Trust" appears on US paper currency as an act to distinguish the US from the officially atheist USSR; the motto had appeared on coins at various times since 1864.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2014 5:46:53 AM

* 1908 - The first production Model T Ford is completed at the company's Piquette Avenue plant in Detroit. Between 1908 and 1927, Ford would build some 15 million Model T cars. It was the longest production run of any automobile model in history until the Volkswagen Beetle surpassed it in 1972.

Before the Model T, cars were a luxury item: At the beginning of 1908, there were fewer than 200,000 on the road. Though the Model T was fairly expensive at first (the cheapest one initially cost $825, or about $18,000 in today's dollars), it was built for ordinary people to drive every day. It had a 22-horsepower, four-cylinder engine and was made of a new kind of heat-treated steel, pioneered by French race car makers, that made it lighter (it weighed just 1,200 pounds) and stronger than its predecessors had been. It could go as fast as 40 miles per hour and could run on gasoline or hemp-based fuel. (When oil prices dropped in the early 20th century, making gasoline more affordable, Ford phased out the hemp option.) "No car under $2,000 offers more," ads crowed, "and no car over $2,000 offers more except the trimmings."

Ford kept prices low by sticking to a single product. By building just one model, for example, the company's engineers could develop a system of interchangeable parts that reduced waste, saved time and made it easy for unskilled workers to assemble the cars. By 1914, the moving assembly line made it possible to produce thousands of cars every week and by 1924, workers at the River Rouge Ford plant in Dearborn, Michigan could cast more than 10,000 Model T cylinder blocks in a day.

But by the 1920s, many Americans wanted more than just a sturdy, affordable car. They wanted style (for many years, the Model T famously came in just one color: black), speed and luxury too. As tastes changed, the era of the Model T came to an end and the last one rolled off the assembly line on May 26, 1927.

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lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2014 3:01:09 AM

1890 – Yosemite National Park was established by the U.S. Congress.
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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2014 2:03:39 AM

This Day in Delaware History: October 1

1664 Two ships under British Sir Robert Carr took possession of New Amstel killing three Dutch and wounding 10 others, and changed its name to New Castle. They also destroyed Plockhoy's Mennonite colony at Cape Henlopen.

1966 Richard Nixon addressed a $100 a plate dinner at the Nur Temple in Wilmington Manor.

1973 Delaware Technical and Community College opened a campus in Stanton.

1985 A World War II observation tower in Cape Henlopen Park near Lewes opened to the public. Being 75 feet high, its 112 steps inside to the top offered a stupendous view on a clear summer's day across the bay to Cape May, New Jersey.
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rjojo40AL
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Message Posted: Sep 30, 2014 10:27:01 AM

1927 Babe Ruth hit his 60th home run. The record stood until Roger Maris hit 61 in 1961. Mark McGwire beat Maris's record in 1998 by hitting 70 and Barry Bonds topped this in 2001 with 73.
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cgstach
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Message Posted: Sep 30, 2014 8:52:35 AM

* 1954 - The USS Nautilus, the world's first nuclear submarine, is commissioned by the U.S. Navy.

The Nautilus was constructed under the direction of U.S. Navy Captain Hyman G. Rickover, a brilliant Russian-born engineer who joined the U.S. atomic program in 1946. In 1947, he was put in charge of the navy's nuclear-propulsion program and began work on an atomic submarine. Regarded as a fanatic by his detractors, Rickover succeeded in developing and delivering the world's first nuclear submarine years ahead of schedule. In 1952, the Nautilus' keel was laid by President Harry S. Truman, and on January 21, 1954, first lady Mamie Eisenhower broke a bottle of champagne across its bow as it was launched into the Thames River at Groton, Connecticut. Commissioned on September 30, 1954, it first ran under nuclear power on the morning of January 17, 1955.

Much larger than the diesel-electric submarines that preceded it, the Nautilus stretched 319 feet and displaced 3,180 tons. It could remain submerged for almost unlimited periods because its atomic engine needed no air and only a very small quantity of nuclear fuel. The uranium-powered nuclear reactor produced steam that drove propulsion turbines, allowing the Nautilus to travel underwater at speeds in excess of 20 knots.

In its early years of service, the USS Nautilus broke numerous submarine travel records and in August 1958 accomplished the first voyage under the geographic North Pole. After a career spanning 25 years and almost 500,000 miles steamed, the Nautilus was decommissioned on March 3, 1980. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1982, the world's first nuclear submarine went on exhibit in 1986 as the Historic Ship Nautilus at the Submarine Force Museum in Groton, Connecticut
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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 30, 2014 6:40:27 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 30

1887 Three thieves attempted to rob the Farmers Bank at 4 The Strand in New Castle, but were foiled in their efforts and escaped but not before bank cashier Richard Cooper shot one in the face.

1937 With its work done on mosquito control, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp closed on Savannah Road in Lewes, but later reopened as a POW camp during World War II.

1944 Lieutenant Joseph Myers of Frederica died instantly in Holland when he threw himself upon a grenade to save the lives of his men. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

2009 As unemployment edged toward 10% nationally, those figures climbed to 8.3% in the state as the economy turned more sour.
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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 30, 2014 3:03:39 AM

1955 – James Dean was killed in a car crash in his Porsche550 Spyder at the age of 24.
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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 29, 2014 10:30:39 AM

1978 John Paul I died one month after becoming pope.

RIP
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 29, 2014 8:07:01 AM

* 1982 - Flight attendant Paula Prince buys a bottle of cyanide-laced Tylenol. Prince was found dead on October 1, becoming the final victim of a mysterious ailment in Chicago, Illinois. Over the previous 24 hours, six other people had suddenly died of unknown causes in northwest Chicago. After Prince's death, Richard Keyworth and Philip Cappitelli, firefighters in the Windy City, realized that all seven victims had ingested Extra-Strength Tylenol prior to becoming ill. Further investigation revealed that several bottles of the Tylenol capsules had been poisoned with cyanide.

Mary Ann Kellerman, a seventh grader, was the first to die after ingesting the over-the-counter pain reliever. The next victim, Adam Janus, ended up in the emergency room in critical condition. After visiting his older brother in the hospital, Stanley Janus went back to Adam's house with his wife, Theresa. To alleviate their stress-induced headaches, they both took capsules from the open Tylenol bottle that was sitting on the counter. They too were poisoned--Stanley died and Theresa lapsed into a coma. That same day, Mary Reiner, who had a headache after giving birth, took the tainted pills. A woman named Mary McFarland was also poisoned.

While bottles of Extra-Strength Tylenol were recalled nationwide, the only contaminated capsules were found in the Chicago area. The culprit was never caught, but the mass murder led to new tamper-proof medicine containers. It also led to a string of copycat crimes, as others sought to blackmail companies with alleged poisoning schemes, most of which proved to be false alarms.

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lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

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Message Posted: Sep 29, 2014 3:02:37 AM

1978 – Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment a little more than one months after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church. His reign as Pope lasted 33 days. The Vatican reported that most likely he died during the night of a heart attack.
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Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2014 11:27:21 PM

Marcello Mastroianni (1924): Actor who has been nominated for Best Actor Oscars for his work in Marriage – Italian Style (1964), A Special Day (1977) and Dark Eyes in 1987. Mastroianni began his career as an extra, and appeared in over 20 Italian films before being cast as the leading man in Tempi Nostri in 1954. Throughout his career, Mastroianni would co-star with Sophia Loren in twelve films, the first being Too Bad She’s Bad in 1955. Some of Mastroianni’s credits include Sunflower (1970), The Priest’s Wife (1971), Fellini’s Roma (1972), Lunatics and Lovers (1975), Stay As You Are (1978), Beyond Obsession (1985), Used People (1992) and Ready to Wear in 1994. Mastroianni passed away in 1996.
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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2014 10:51:50 AM

1963 Roy Lichtenstein's pop art work Whaam!, depicting in comic-book style a US jet shooting down an enemy fighter, is exhibited for the first time; it will become one of the best known examples of pop art. Nice work

[Edited by: rjojo40AL at 9/28/2014 10:52:39 AM EST]
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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2014 5:12:41 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 28

1846 Delaware College students (now the University of Delaware) were warned not to patronize Mr. Hill's shop in Newark because it sold intoxicating liquors.

1978 About 700 people paid $10 each to see former California Governor Ronald Reagan at the Grand Opera House and 45 more spent $500 to have lunch with him at the Hotel Du Pont. Reagan came to Delaware on behalf of incumbent Congressman Thomas B. Evans. Two years later Reagan was a candidate himself for President.

1985 The Grand Eagle, a 761 foot Liberian tanker loaded with 22 million gallons of oil from the North Sea off Scotland ran aground near Claymont. From a hole torn in the hull, 435,000 gallons escaped into the Delaware River forcing a massive cleanup.

2001 A Laurel Du Pont retiree woman claimed the state's All Cash Lotto jackpot of $358,000. She bought her winning ticket while taking her dog out for a ride in her car.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2014 4:55:43 AM

* 1918 - A Liberty Loan parade in Philadelphia prompts a huge outbreak of the flu epidemic in the city. By the time the epidemic ended, an estimated 30 million people were dead worldwide.

Influenza is a highly contagious virus that attacks the respiratory system and can mutate very quickly to avoid being killed by the human immune system. Generally, only the very old and the very young are susceptible to death from the flu. Though a pandemic of the virus in 1889 had killed thousands all over the world, it was not until 1918 that the world discovered how deadly the flu could be.

The most likely origin of the 1918 flu pandemic was a bird or farm animal in the American Midwest. The virus may have traveled among birds, pigs, sheep, moose, bison and elk, eventually mutating into a version that took hold in the human population. The best evidence suggests that the flu spread slowly through the United States in the first half of the year, then spread to Europe via some of the 200,000 American troops who traveled there to fight in World War I. By June, the flu seemed to have mostly disappeared from North America, after taking a considerable toll.

Over the summer of 1918, the flu spread quickly all over Europe. One of its first stops was Spain, where it killed so many people that it became known the world over as the Spanish Flu. The Spanish Flu was highly unusual because it seemed to affect strong people in the prime of their lives rather than babies and the elderly. By the end of the summer, about 10,000 people were dead. In most cases, hemorrhages in the nose and lungs killed victims within three days.

As fall began, the flu epidemic spiraled out of control. Ports throughout the world usually the first locations in a country to be infected--reported serious problems. In Sierra Leone, 500 of 600 dock workers were too sick to work. Africa, India and the Far East reported epidemics. The spread of the virus among so many people also seems to have made it even more deadly and contagious as it mutated. When the second wave of flu hit London and Boston in September, the results were far worse than those from the previous flu strain.

Twelve thousand soldiers in Massachusetts came down with the flu in mid-September. Each division of the armed services was reporting hundreds of deaths each week due to flu. Philadelphia was the hardest-hit city in the United States. After the Liberty Loan parade on September 28, thousands of people became infected. The city morgue, built to hold 36 bodies, was now faced with the arrival of hundreds within a few days. The entire city was quarantined and nearly 12,000 city residents died. Overall, in the United States, five out of every thousand people fell victim to the flu.

In the rest of the world, the death toll was much worse. In Latin America, 10 out of every thousand people died. In Africa, it was 15 per thousand and in Asia it was as high as 35 per thousand. It is estimated that up to 20 million people perished in India alone. Ten percent of the entire population of Tahiti died within three weeks. In Western Samoa, 20 percent of the population died. More people died from the flu than from all of the battles of World War I combined.

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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2014 3:02:30 AM

1867 - Toronto became the capital of Ontario.
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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 27, 2014 9:08:59 PM

This Day in Delaware History: September 27

1836 Running against President Van Buren, presidential candidate General William Henry Harrison, came to Wilmington to extol the virtues of Delaware's Revolutionary War hero Robert Kirkwood as he headed north on a campaign trip.

1864 Sgt. George Hodgson, Company D, 1st Delaware Regiment, died of scurvy in Andersonville Prison in Georgia.

1872 Forest Church of Middletown held its picnic in Colonel Joshua Clayton's woods north of town, half a mile west of Armstrong Corner.

1940 The Du Pont Company opened Nemours, its newest building in Wilmington.

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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 27, 2014 3:39:33 PM

1959
Typhoon Vera battered the Japanese island of Honshu, killing almost 5,000 people.

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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 27, 2014 10:08:43 AM

* 1540 - In Rome, the Society of Jesus--a Roman Catholic missionary organization--receives its charter from Pope Paul III. The Jesuit order played an important role in the Counter-Reformation and eventually succeeded in converting millions around the world to Catholicism.

The Jesuit movement was founded by Ignatius de Loyola, a Spanish soldier turned priest, in August 1534. The first Jesuits--Ignatius and six of his students--took vows of poverty and chastity and made plans to work for the conversion of Muslims. If travel to the Holy Land was not possible, they vowed to offer themselves to the pope for apostolic work. Unable to travel to Jerusalem because of the Turkish wars, they went to Rome instead to meet with the pope and request permission to form a new religious order. In September 1540, Pope Paul III approved Ignatius' outline of the Society of Jesus, and the Jesuit order was born.

Under Ignatius' charismatic leadership, the Society of Jesus grew quickly. Jesuit missionaries played a leading role in the Counter-Reformation and won back many of the European faithful who had been lost to Protestantism. In Ignatius' lifetime, Jesuits were also dispatched to India, Brazil, the Congo region, and Ethiopia. Education was of utmost importance to the Jesuits, and in Rome Ignatius founded the Roman College (later called the Gregorian University) and the Germanicum, a school for German priests. The Jesuits also ran several charitable organizations, such as one for former prostitutes and one for converted Jews. When Ignatius de Loyola died in July 1556, there were more than 1,000 Jesuit priests.

During the next century, the Jesuits set up ministries around the globe. The "Black-Robes," as they were known in Native America, often preceded other Europeans in their infiltration of foreign lands and societies. The life of a Jesuit was one of immense risk, and thousands of priests were persecuted or killed by foreign authorities hostile to their mission of conversion. However, in some nations, such as India and China, the Jesuits were welcomed as men of wisdom and science.

With the rise of nationalism in the 18th century, most European countries suppressed the Jesuits, and in 1773 Pope Clement XIV dissolved the order under pressure from the Bourbon monarchs. However, in 1814, Pope Pius VII gave in to popular demand and reestablished the Jesuits as an order, and they continue their missionary work to this day. Ignatius de Loyola was canonized a Catholic saint in 1622.

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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 27, 2014 3:40:11 AM

1968 – The stage musical Hair opened Shaftesbury Theatre in London. It had 1,998 performances until the roof collapsed and forced closure in 1973.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 26, 2014 5:19:26 PM

* 1928 - Work begins at Chicago's new Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. (The company had officially incorporated the day before.) In 1930, Galvin would introduce the Motorola radio, the first mass-produced commercial car radio. (The name had two parts: "motor" evoked cars and motion, while "ola" derived from "Victrola" and was supposed to make people think of music.)

In 1921, engineer Paul Galvin and his friend Edward Stewart started a storage-battery factory in Marshfield, Wisconsin; it went out of business two years later. In 1926, Galvin and Stewart re-started their battery-manufacturing company, this time in Chicago. That one went out of business too, but not before the partners figured out a way for home radios to draw power from an electrical wall outlet; they called it the dry-battery eliminator. Galvin bought back the eliminator part of his bankrupt company at auction for $750 and went right back into business, building and repairing eliminators and AC radio sets for customers like Sears, Roebuck.

Soon, however, Galvin's attention turned to the car-radio business. The first car radios--portable "travel radios" powered by batteries, followed by custom-installed built-in radios that cost $250 apiece (about $2,800 in today's dollars)--had appeared in 1926, but they were way too expensive for the average driver. If he could find a way to mass-produce affordable car radios, Galvin thought, he'd be rich. In June 1930, he enlisted inventors Elmer Wavering and William Lear to retrofit his old Studebaker with a radio and drove 800 miles to the Radio Manufacturers Association's annual meeting in Atlantic City. He parked outside the convention, turned up the music (for this purpose, Wavering had installed a special speaker under the Studebaker's hood), and waited for the RMAers' orders to come rolling in.

A few did, and Galvin sold enough of his $110 5T71 car radios to come close to breaking even for the year. He changed his company's name to Motorola and changed the way we drive--and ride in--cars forever.

For his part, William Lear went on to invent the eight-track cartridge-tape system, which came standard in every Ford car starting in 1966. Meanwhile, carmakers developed their own radio-manufacturing divisions, gradually squeezing Motorola out of the market it had built. The company stopped making car radios in 1984. Today, it's best known for making cellular phones.

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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 26, 2014 2:10:36 PM

1960 Richard M. Nixon and John F. Kennedy took part in the first televised presidential debate.
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prius22
Champion Author Twin Cities

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Message Posted: Sep 26, 2014 11:04:34 AM

I drank a 40oz of Colt 45 did double the malt. Label out or get cussed the FK out. Malt Liqour.
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lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

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Message Posted: Sep 26, 2014 3:02:49 AM

1973 – The Concorde made its first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in record breaking time.
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Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2014 11:49:56 PM

2001 - Michael Jordan announced that he would return to the NBA as a player for the Washington Wizards. Jordan became the president of basketball operations for the team on January 19, 2000.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2014 4:44:31 PM

* 1789 - The first Congress of the United States approves 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution, and sends them to the states for ratification. The amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were designed to protect the basic rights of U.S. citizens, guaranteeing the freedom of speech, press, assembly, and exercise of religion; the right to fair legal procedure and to bear arms; and that powers not delegated to the federal government were reserved for the states and the people.

Influenced by the English Bill of Rights of 1689, the Bill of Rights was also drawn from Virginia's Declaration of Rights, drafted by George Mason in 1776. Mason, a native Virginian, was a lifelong champion of individual liberties, and in 1787 he attended the Constitutional Convention and criticized the final document for lacking constitutional protection of basic political rights. In the ratification process that followed, Mason and other critics agreed to approve the Constitution in exchange for the assurance that amendments would immediately be adopted.

In December 1791, Virginia became the 10th of 14 states to approve 10 of the 12 amendments, thus giving the Bill of Rights the two-thirds majority of state ratification necessary to make it legal. Of the two amendments not ratified, the first concerned the population system of representation, while the second prohibited laws varying the payment of congressional members from taking effect until an election intervened. The first of these two amendments was never ratified, while the second was finally ratified more than 200 years later, in 1992.

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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2014 11:42:17 AM

1981 Sandra Day O'Connor was sworn in as the first female justice on the Supreme Court.

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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2014 6:18:20 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 25

1676 British Governor Edmund Andros established a penal code for his Delaware colony claiming 11 crimes as capital among which were treason, murder, blasphemy, kidnapping, perjury or depriving another of his life, and unprovoked attack on a parent by a child over 16.

1772 Old Christ Church was completed at Chipman's Pond near Laurel at the cost of £510 in what was then the Colony of Maryland.

1917 Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall returned to the US Senate after a two month illness of his wife. Senator Willard Saulsbury, Jr., meantime as Pro Tem, served as President of the US Senate.

2006 Seven Pennsylvania fishermen were rescued from their life raft and brought into Indian River Coast Guard station after being adrift 48 hours. Their sport fishing boat, the Chief, struck an unidentified object and sank immediately.
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lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2014 3:01:29 AM

1977 – Chicago had the first running Chicago Marathon with over 4,200 participating.
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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 24, 2014 3:26:10 PM

1979 CompuServe (CIS) offers one of the first online services to consumers; it will dominate among Internet service providers for consumers through the mid-1990s.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 24, 2014 9:01:43 AM

* 1789 - The Judiciary Act of 1789 is passed by Congress and signed by President George Washington, establishing the Supreme Court of the United States as a tribunal made up of six justices who were to serve on the court until death or retirement. That day, President Washington nominated John Jay to preside as chief justice, and John Rutledge, William Cushing, John Blair, Robert Harrison, and James Wilson to be associate justices. On September 26, all six appointments were confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

The U.S. Supreme Court was established by Article 3 of the U.S. Constitution. The Constitution granted the Supreme Court ultimate jurisdiction over all laws, especially those in which their constitutionality was at issue. The high court was also designated to oversee cases concerning treaties of the United States, foreign diplomats, admiralty practice, and maritime jurisdiction. On February 1, 1790, the first session of the U.S. Supreme Court was held in New York City's Royal Exchange Building.

The U.S. Supreme Court grew into the most important judicial body in the world in terms of its central place in the American political order. According to the Constitution, the size of the court is set by Congress, and the number of justices varied during the 19th century before stabilizing in 1869 at nine. In times of constitutional crisis, the nation's highest court has always played a definitive role in resolving, for better or worse, the great issues of the time.

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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 24, 2014 3:36:24 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 24

1921 The Delaware College (now the University of Delaware) football team suffered its worst defeat ever by losing to the University of Pennsylvania 89-0 again. The score was identical to the game played by the same schools two years before.

1936 The Rural Electrification Administration (REA) began Delaware Electric Cooperative in Greenwood to aid the nine out of 10 downstate farmers who didn't enjoy the benefit of electricity in rural areas.

1953 The old Odessa Presbyterian Church on Main Street whose congregation of only 10 members had been dissolved the previous April, was put up for sale.

2006 McQuay's Market which stood 80 years at 510 Rehoboth Ave. near the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal, was demolished.
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lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

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Message Posted: Sep 24, 2014 3:04:51 AM

1948 – The Honda Motor Company was founded in Hamamatsu, Japan by Soichiro Honda who, as the founder remained in Leadership from 1948 to 1973.
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rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Sep 23, 2014 10:15:52 AM

1952 Vice presidential candidate Richard Nixon delivered his "Checkers speech" rebutting charges of improper campaign financing.
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cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Sep 23, 2014 8:51:44 AM

* 1917 - The German flying ace Werner Voss is shot down and killed during a dogfight with British pilots in the skies over Belgium, on the Western Front during World War I.

Voss, born in 1887, enlisted as a cavalry soldier in 1914, but soon transferred to the Luftstreitkrafte or German Air Service, where he was posted to the Jasta 2 squadron, commanded by the renowned pilot Oswald Boelcke. After serving as a wingman to Manfred von Richthofen—the ace pilot later known as the Red Baron—Voss quickly established a reputation as a leading pilot in his own right, and a rival to Richthofen. By May 1917, Voss had amassed 28 victories in the air, earning the prestigious Pour le Merite award.

At Richthofen’s request, Voss was attached to his own squadron, Jasta 10—known as the "Flying Circus." He earned another 14 victories there before September 23, 1917, when he was involved in a dogfight with the renowned British 56 Squadron "B" Flight—including the ace pilots James McCudden and Arthur Rhys Davids—above the Western Front in Belgium. Though Voss skillfully eluded his pursuers for some 10 minutes in his silver-grey Fokker triplane, he was shot down by a British attack and crashed north of Frezenburg. As McCudden later observed: "I shall never forget my admiration for that German pilot, who single handed, fought seven of us for ten minutes. I saw him go into a fairly steep dive and so I continued to watch, and then saw the triplane hit the ground and disappear into a thousand fragments, for it seemed to me that it literally went into powder."

The attack was generally credited to Davids, who also shot down the German pilot Carl Menckhoff when the latter came to Voss’ aid. Menckhoff survived the fight—one of the best-known aerial dogfights of World War I—to lead his own squadron throughout the end of the war. As for Voss, his bravery and skill was celebrated posthumously on both sides of the line. In James McCudden’s words: "His flying is wonderful, his courage magnificent and in my opinion he was the bravest German airman whom it has been my privilege to see."

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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 23, 2014 3:02:49 AM

2004 - Hurricane Jeanne hit Haiti and over 1000 people were reported to have been killed by the floods.
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frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

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Message Posted: Sep 23, 2014 2:07:11 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 23

1891 Counselman's Packing house in Milton was completely destroyed by fire after streets had been jammed with carts and wagons loaded down with more tomatoes than anyone had ever seen in town.

1954 The State of Delaware Board of Education met in Milford in emergency session with the pending racial integration of the public schools there. Local school board members offered to resign and eventually did whereupon new members were elected.

1970 Delaware's Motor Vehicle Division began inspections on Wednesday, 12 noon to 8:30 p. m.

2002 The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) officially reopened Spicer Road (County Road 240) near Ellendale and declared it to be the last dirt road to be paved in Sussex County
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cgstach
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* 1862 - President Abraham Lincoln issues a preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which sets a date for the freedom of more than 3 million black slaves in the United States and recasts the Civil War as a fight against slavery.

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, shortly after Lincoln's inauguration as America's 16th president, he maintained that the war was about restoring the Union and not about slavery. He avoided issuing an anti-slavery proclamation immediately, despite the urgings of abolitionists and radical Republicans, as well as his personal belief that slavery was morally repugnant. Instead, Lincoln chose to move cautiously until he could gain wide support from the public for such a measure.

In July 1862, Lincoln informed his cabinet that he would issue an emancipation proclamation but that it would exempt the so-called border states, which had slaveholders but remained loyal to the Union. His cabinet persuaded him not to make the announcement until after a Union victory. Lincoln's opportunity came following the Union win at the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. On September 22, the president announced that slaves in areas still in rebellion within 100 days would be free.

On January 1, 1863, Lincoln issued the final Emancipation Proclamation, which declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebel states "are, and henceforward shall be free." The proclamation also called for the recruitment and establishment of black military units among the Union forces. An estimated 180,000 African Americans went on to serve in the army, while another 18,000 served in the navy.

After the Emancipation Proclamation, backing the Confederacy was seen as favoring slavery. It became impossible for anti-slavery nations such as Great Britain and France, who had been friendly to the Confederacy, to get involved on behalf of the South. The proclamation also unified and strengthened Lincoln's party, the Republicans, helping them stay in power for the next two decades.

The proclamation was a presidential order and not a law passed by Congress, so Lincoln then pushed for an antislavery amendment to the U.S. Constitution to ensure its permanence. With the passage of the 13th Amendment in 1865, slavery was eliminated throughout America (although blacks would face another century of struggle before they truly began to gain equal rights).

Lincoln's handwritten draft of the final Emancipation Proclamation was destroyed in the Chicago Fire of 1871. Today, the original official version of the document is housed in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.
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rjojo40AL
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Message Posted: Sep 22, 2014 11:23:35 AM

1955 - Commercial television began in Great Britain. The rules said that only six minutes of ads were allowed each hour and there was no Sunday morning TV permitted.
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frankbank
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Message Posted: Sep 22, 2014 7:15:07 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 22

1676 James, the Duke of York's laws and courts were established in all three counties of the Delaware Colony while the British Governor Edmund Andros established Justices of the Peace who decided on matters under £20.

1862 President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation to become effective January 1, 1863 freeing all slaves in rebellious states. Delaware was unaffected because of its status as a border state.

1928 New homes were being shown in the Highland Park development in Dover.

1952 Agricultural Hall opened on the University of Delaware farm site south of Newark.
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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 22, 2014 3:01:29 AM

1888 – The first issue of National Geographic Magazine was pubished.
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cgstach
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* 1780 - During the American Revolution, American General Benedict Arnold meets with British Major John Andre to discuss handing over West Point to the British, in return for the promise of a large sum of money and a high position in the British army. The plot was foiled and Arnold, a former American hero, became synonymous with the word "traitor."

Arnold was born into a well-respected family in Norwich, Connecticut, on January 14, 1741. He apprenticed with an apothecary and was a member of the militia during the French and Indian War (1754-1763). He later became a successful trader and joined the Continental Army when the Revolutionary War broke out between Great Britain and its 13 American colonies in 1775. When the war ended in 1883, the colonies had won their independence from Britain and formed a new nation, the United States.

During the war, Benedict Arnold proved himself a brave and skillful leader, helping Ethan Allen's troops capture Fort Ticonderoga in 1775 and then participating in the unsuccessful attack on British Quebec later that year, which earned him a promotion to brigadier general. Arnold distinguished himself in campaigns at Lake Champlain, Ridgefield and Saratoga, and gained the support of George Washington. However, Arnold had enemies within the military and in 1777, five men of lesser rank were promoted over him. Over the course of the next few years, Arnold married for a second time and he and his new wife lived a lavish lifestyle in Philadelphia, accumulating substantial debt. The debt and the resentment Arnold felt over not being promoted faster were motivating factors in his choice to become a turncoat.

In 1780, Arnold was given command of West Point, an American fort on the Hudson River in New York (and future home of the U.S. military academy, established in 1802). Arnold contacted Sir Henry Clinton, head of the British forces, and proposed handing over West Point and his men. On September 21 of that year, Arnold met with Major John Andre and made his traitorous pact. However, the conspiracy was uncovered and Andre was captured and executed. Arnold, the former American patriot, fled to the enemy side and went on to lead British troops in Virginia and Connecticut. He later moved to England, though he never received all of what he'd been promised by the British. He died in London on June 14, 1801.

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rjojo40AL
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1937 J.R.R. Tolkien's fantasy novel The Hobbit is published.
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frankbank
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Message Posted: Sep 21, 2014 8:49:18 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 21

1798 George Read, former acting governor (1777-1778), and Delaware Signer of the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution, died at his home in New Castle at age 65.

1933 Richard C. du Pont of Wilmington soared in a glider from Waynesboro, VA to Frederick, MD, a distance of 122 miles.

1938 The devastating Long Island/New England hurricane passed 100 miles east of Cape May and spared Delaware serious damage.

2013 The Town of Laurel dedicated the River Park in honor of Roger C. Fisher, Sussex County's first African American municipal mayor.

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lvskyguy
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Message Posted: Sep 21, 2014 3:04:08 AM

1970 – NFL Football debuted on ABC.
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cgstach
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* 1777 - Near Paoli, Pennsylvania, General Charles Grey and nearly 5,000 British soldiers launch a surprise attack on a small regiment of Patriot troops commanded by General Anthony Wayne in what becomes known as the Paoli Massacre. Not wanting to lose the element of surprise, Grey ordered his troops to empty their muskets and to use only bayonets or swords to attack the sleeping Americans under the cover of darkness.

With the help of a Loyalist spy who provided a secret password and led them to the camp, General Grey and the British launched the successful attack on the unsuspecting men of the Pennsylvania regiment, stabbing them to death as they slept. It was also alleged that the British soldiers took no prisoners during the attack, stabbing or setting fire to those who tried to surrender. Before it was over, nearly 200 Americans were killed or wounded. The Paoli Massacre became a rallying cry for the Americans against British atrocities for the rest of the Revolutionary War.

Less than two years later, Wayne became known as "Mad Anthony" for his bravery leading an impressive Patriot assault on British cliff-side fortifications at Stony Point on the Hudson River, 12 miles from West Point. Like Grey's attack at Paoli, Wayne's men only used bayonets in the 30-minute night attack, which resulted in 94 dead and 472 captured British soldiers.

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Joisygal
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1946 - WNBT-TV in New York became the first station to promote a motion picture. Scenes from "The Jolson Story" were shown.

1953 - The TV show "Letter to Loretta" premiered. The name was changed to "The Loretta Young Show" on February 14, 1954.

1955 - "You'll Never Be Rich" premiered on CBS-TV. The name was changed less than two months later to "The Phil Silvers Show."

1984 - "The Cosby Show" premiered on NBC-TV.
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rjojo40AL
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1998
Baltimore Oriole shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr., sat out a game, ending his consecutive game playing streak. Ripken played 2,632 consecutive games over
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cgstach
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* 1957 - The United States detonates a 1.7 kiloton nuclear weapon in an underground tunnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a 1,375 square mile research center located 65 miles north of Las Vegas. The test, known as Rainier, was the first fully contained underground detonation and produced no radioactive fallout. A modified W-25 warhead weighing 218 pounds and measuring 25.7 inches in diameter and 17.4 inches in length was used for the test. Rainier was part of a series of 29 nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons safety tests known as Operation Plumbbob that were conducted at the NTS between May 28, 1957, and October 7, 1957.

In December 1941, the U.S. government committed to building the world's first nuclear weapon when President Franklin Roosevelt authorized $2 billion in funding for what came to be known as the Manhattan Project. The first nuclear weapon test took place on July 16, 1945, at the Trinity site near Alamogordo, New Mexico. A few weeks later, on August 6, 1945, with the U.S. at war against Japan, President Harry Truman authorized the dropping of an atomic bomb named Little Boy over Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, on August 9, a nuclear bomb called Fat Man was dropped over Nagasaki. Two hundred thousand people, according to some estimates, were killed in the attacks on the two cities and on August 15, 1945, Japan surrendered to the Allied Powers.

1957's Operation Plumbbob took place at a time when the U.S. was engaged in a Cold War and nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union. In 1963, the U.S. signed the Limited Test Ban Treaty, which banned nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere, underwater and outer space. A total of 928 tests took place at the Nevada Test Site between 1951 and 1992, when the U.S. conducted its last underground nuclear test. In 1996, the U.S signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, which prohibits nuclear detonations in all environments.

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jojoAL
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Message Posted: Sep 19, 2014 1:50:25 PM

On this day in 1881, President James A. Garfield, who had been in office just under four months, succumbs to wounds inflicted by an assassin 80 days earlier, on July 2.

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