Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    3:32 PM

Message Forum - Read Message

Category: Off Topic > Topics Add to favorite topics   Post new topicPost New Topic
Author Topic: This day in History Back to Topics
taztug

Champion Author
Wilmington

Posts:6,244
Points:1,300,210
Joined:Aug 2004
Message Posted: May 10, 2006 12:44:24 PM

On May 10th the following happend in the old west:

Tanscontinental Railroad
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 16, 2014 10:12:47 AM

1949 - KABC TV channel 7 in Los Angeles, CA (ABC) begins broadcasting
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 16, 2014 9:57:44 AM

* 1908 - Buick Motor Company head William Crapo Durant spends $2,000 to incorporate General Motors in New Jersey. Durant, a high-school dropout, had made his fortune building horse-drawn carriages, and in fact he hated cars--he thought they were noisy, smelly, and dangerous. Nevertheless, the giant company he built would dominate the American auto industry for decades.

In the first years of the 20th century, however, that industry was a mess. There were about 45 different car companies in the United States, most of which sold only a handful of cars each year (and many of which had an unpleasant tendency to take customers' down payments and then go out of business before delivering a completed automobile). Industrialist Benjamin Briscoe called this way of doing business "manufacturing gambling," and he proposed a better idea. To build consumer confidence and drive the weakest car companies out of business, he wanted to consolidate the largest and most reliable manufacturers (Ford, REO, his own Maxwell-Briscoe, and Durant's Buick) into one big company. This idea appealed to Durant (though not to Henry Ford or REO's Ransom E. Olds), who had made his millions in the carriage business just that way: Instead of selling one kind of vehicle to one kind of customer, Durant's company had sold carriages and carts of all kinds, from the utilitarian to the luxurious.

But Briscoe wanted to merge all the companies completely into one, while Durant wanted to build a holding company that would leave its individual parts more or less alone. ("Durant is for states' rights," Briscoe said. "I am for a union.") Durant got his way, and the new GM was the opposite of Ford: Instead of just making one car, like the Model T, it produced a wide variety of cars for a wide variety of buyers. In its first two years, GM cobbled together 30 companies, including 11 automakers like Oldsmobile, Cadillac, and Oakland (which later became Pontiac), some supplier firms, and even an electric company.

Buying all these companies was too expensive for the fledgling GM, and in 1911 the corporation's board forced the spendthrift Durant to quit. He started a new car company with the Chevrolet brothers and was able to buy enough GM stock to regain control of the corporation in 1916, but his profligate ways got the better of him and he was forced out again in 1920. During the Depression, Durant went bankrupt, and he spent his last years managing a bowling alley in Flint.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 16, 2014 3:02:26 AM

1972 – “The Bob Newhart Show” aired on CBS. It lasted 6 seasons, 142 episodes.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:14,693
Points:3,262,040
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Sep 15, 2014 11:38:39 PM

1965 - "Lost in Space" premiered on CBS TV.

1965 - "Green Acres" premiered on CBS TV.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 15, 2014 4:58:26 PM

* 1858 - The new Overland Mail Company sends out its first two stages, inaugurating government mail service between the eastern and western regions of the nation.

With California booming, thanks to the 1849 Gold Rush, Americans east and west had been clamoring for faster and surer transcontinental mail service for years. Finally, in March 1857, the U.S. Congress passed an act authorizing an overland mail delivery service and a $600,000 yearly subsidy for whatever company could succeed in reliably transporting the mail twice a week from St. Louis to San Francisco in less than 25 days. The postmaster general awarded the first government contract and subsidy to the Overland Mail Company. Under the guidance of a board of directors that included John Butterfield and William Fargo, the Overland Mail Company spent $1 million improving its winding 2,800-mile route and building way stations at 10-15 mile intervals. Teams of thundering horses soon raced across the wide open spaces of the West, pulling custom-built Concord coaches with seats for nine passengers and a rear boot for the mail.

For passengers, the overland route was anything but a pleasure trip. Packed into the narrow confines of the coaches, they alternately baked or froze as they bumped across the countryside, and dust was an inescapable companion. Since the coaches traveled night and day, travelers were reluctant to stop and sleep at one of the "home stations" along the route because they risked being stranded if later stages were full. Many opted to try and make it through the three-week trip by sleeping on the stage, but the constant bumping and noise made real sleep almost impossible. Travelers also found that toilets and baths were few and far between, the food was poor and pricey, and the stage drivers were often drunk, rude, profane, or all three. Robberies and Indian attacks were a genuine threat, though they occurred far less commonly than popularly believed. The company posted guards at stations in dangerous areas, and armed men occasionally rode with the coach driver to protect passengers.

Though other faster mail delivery services soon came to compete with the Overland Mail Company-most famously the Pony Express-the nation's first regular trans-western mail service continued to operate as a part of the larger Wells, Fargo and Company operation until May 10, 1869, the day the first transcontinental railroad was completed. On that day the U.S. government cancelled its last overland mail contract.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 15, 2014 12:20:13 PM

1935 - Nuremberg Laws deprives German Jews of citizenship & makes swastika official symbol of Nazi Germany
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 15, 2014 3:04:22 AM

1982 – The first edition of USA Today was published.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 14, 2014 6:21:06 PM

* 1959 - A Soviet rocket crashes into the moon's surface, becoming the first man-made object sent from earth to reach the lunar surface. The event gave the Soviets a short-lived advantage in the "space race" and prompted even greater effort by the United States to develop its own space program.

In 1957, the Soviets shocked the United States by becoming the first nation to launch a satellite into orbit around the earth. Sputnik, as it was called, frightened many Americans, who believed that the Soviets would soon develop an entire new class of weapons that could be fired from space. U.S. officials were especially concerned, for the success of Sputnik was a direct rebuke to American claims of technological and scientific superiority over the communist regime in Russia. It was a tremendous propaganda victory for the Soviets, and gave them an edge in attracting less-developed nations into the Soviet orbit with promises of technological aid and assistance.

The United States responded by accelerating its own space program, and just months after Sputnik, an American satellite went into orbit. In September 1959, the Soviets upped the ante considerably with the announcement that a rocket carrying the flag of the Soviet Union had crashed onto the moon's surface. In Washington, a muted congratulation was sent to the Soviet scientists who managed the feat. At the same time, however, the United States warned the Soviet Union that sending the Russian flag to the moon gave the Soviets no territorial rights over the celestial body. Vice President Richard Nixon expressed some sour grapes by noting that it took the Soviet four tries to hit the moon and reassured Americans that "We are way ahead" in the space race.

Nixon's reassurances aside, the Soviet success in sending a rocket to the moon provoked even greater effort by the United States to gain an advantage in the space race. In 1960, presidential candidate John F. Kennedy made it one of his campaign themes. After winning the election, President Kennedy increased spending for the space program and vowed that America would send a man to the moon by the end of the decade. In 1969, American astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 14, 2014 11:53:04 AM

1954 - Hurricane Edna (2nd of 1954) hits NYC, $50 million damage
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 14, 2014 3:01:59 AM

2000 - Microsoft released Windows ME. It included Internet Explorer 5.5 and Windows Media Player 7. ‘ME’ (the Millennium Edition) soon became known as “Mistake Edition” due to problems installing it, getting it to run and getting it to work with other hardware and software.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 13, 2014 6:14:27 PM

* 1814 - Francis Scott Key pens a poem which is later set to music and in 1931 becomes America's national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner." The poem, originally titled "The Defence of Fort McHenry," was written after Key witnessed the Maryland fort being bombarded by the British during the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the sight of a lone U.S. flag still flying over Fort McHenry at daybreak, as reflected in the now-famous words of the "Star-Spangled Banner": "And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there."

Francis Scott Key was born on August 1, 1779, at Terra Rubra, his family's estate in Frederick County (now Carroll County), Maryland. He became a successful lawyer in Maryland and Washington, D.C., and was later appointed U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia.

On June 18, 1812, America declared war on Great Britain after a series of trade disagreements. In August 1814, British troops invaded Washington, D.C., and burned the White House, Capitol Building and Library of Congress. Their next target was Baltimore.

After one of Key's friends, Dr. William Beanes, was taken prisoner by the British, Key went to Baltimore, located the ship where Beanes was being held and negotiated his release. However, Key and Beanes weren't allowed to leave until after the British bombardment of Fort McHenry. Key watched the bombing campaign unfold from aboard a ship located about eight miles away. After a day, the British were unable to destroy the fort and gave up. Key was relieved to see the American flag still flying over Fort McHenry and quickly penned a few lines in tribute to what he had witnessed.

The poem was printed in newspapers and eventually set to the music of a popular English drinking tune called "To Anacreon in Heaven" by composer John Stafford Smith. People began referring to the song as "The Star-Spangled Banner" and in 1916 President Woodrow Wilson announced that it should be played at all official events. It was adopted as the national anthem on March 3, 1931.

Francis Scott Key died of pleurisy on January 11, 1843. Today, the flag that flew over Fort McHenry in 1914 is housed at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 13, 2014 11:54:40 AM

1977 - General Motors introduces 1st US diesel auto (Oldsmobile 88)
Profile Pic
frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

Posts:8,341
Points:1,262,345
Joined:Jan 2009
Message Posted: Sep 13, 2014 5:07:01 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 13

1814 After the British burned Washington and were headed for Baltimore, the city of Wilmington prepared for the worst.

1924 After appeals to the Catholic Church by Wilmington's Italians leaders, Father John Francis Tucker, an Irish priest who spoke fluent Italian, was appointed by Bishop John J. Monaghan to attend to their needs.

1944 When a hurricane passed 50 miles east of Delaware, Bowers Beach, Woodland Beach, Big Stone Beach, Kitts Hummock, and Slaughter Beach were evacuated. The US destroyer Warrington off the coast unsuccessfully tried to stay afloat, but only 65 of 300 crewmen survived. One of the crewmen, Robert G. Kern, 1st Class, USN from Milford, was not among the survivors.

1996 Bobby Labonte set a qualifying record at Dover Downs International Speedway with 155.086 mph in 23.213 seconds.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 13, 2014 3:29:28 AM

2001 – Scheduled Airlines began flying after being grounded from the 9-11 attacks.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 12, 2014 5:46:30 PM

* 1953 - Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy, the future 35th president of the United States, marries Jacqueline Bouvier in Newport, Rhode Island. Seven years later, the couple would become the youngest president and first lady in American history.

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy was born into a prominent New York family in 1929 and grew into an avid horsewoman and reader. In 1951, after graduating from George Washington University, Jackie, as she was called, took a tour of Europe. That fall, she returned to the U.S. to begin her first job as the Washington Times-Herald's "Inquiring Camera Girl." Shortly afterward, she met a young, handsome senator from Massachusetts named John Kennedy at a dinner party in Georgetown. They dated over the next two years, during which time Jackie mused at the idea that she might actually marry a man who was allergic to horses, something she never thought she would have considered. In 1953, the two were engaged, when Kennedy gave Jackie a 2.88-carat diamond-and-emerald ring from Van Cleef and Arpels.

"Jack," as Kennedy was called, and Jackie married on September 12, 1953, at St. Mary's Church in Newport, Rhode Island. Jackie wore an ivory silk gown made by Ann Lowe, an African-American designer. The Catholic mass was attended by 750 guests and an additional 450 people joined the wedding reception at Hammersmith Farm. The couple danced to the Meyer Davis Orchestra's version of "I Married an Angel." Davis also performed at Jackie's parents' wedding and at Kennedy's inaugural ball.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 12, 2014 11:11:08 AM

2003 - The United Nations lifts sanctions against Libya after that country agreed to accept responsibility and recompense the families of victims in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.
Profile Pic
leemun
Champion Author Utah

Posts:8,012
Points:1,576,580
Joined:May 2010
Message Posted: Sep 12, 2014 11:01:28 AM

1683 - Austro-Ottoman War: Battle of Vienna - several European armies join forces to defeat the Ottoman Empire. This battle was a stunning defeat for the Ottoman Empire, which for centuries had been usurping Christian lands from Anatolia northward through the Balkans and Hungary to the gates of Vienna, residence of the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. The invasion of Europe by the forces of Islam was thus stopped and Christian nations restored in Eastern Europe and the Balkans. In thankfulness, today eat a croissant (crescent roll) which legend tells us was invented to commemorate the destruction of Islam, which the crescent represents, by symbolically eating it up.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 12, 2014 3:02:23 AM

2005 – Hong Kong Disneyland opened in Penny’s Bay, Lantau Island, Hong Kong.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 11, 2014 9:35:22 AM

* 2001 - At 8:45 a.m. on a clear Tuesday morning, an American Airlines Boeing 767 loaded with 20,000 gallons of jet fuel crashes into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. The impact left a gaping, burning hole near the 80th floor of the 110-story skyscraper, instantly killing hundreds of people and trapping hundreds more in higher floors. As the evacuation of the tower and its twin got underway, television cameras broadcasted live images of what initially appeared to be a freak accident. Then, 18 minutes after the first plane hit, a second Boeing 767--United Airlines Flight 175--appeared out of the sky, turned sharply toward the World Trade Center, and sliced into the south tower at about the 60th floor. The collision caused a massive explosion that showered burning debris over surrounding buildings and the streets below. America was under attack.

The attackers were Islamic terrorists from Saudi Arabia and several other Arab nations. Reportedly financed by Saudi fugitive Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda terrorist organization, they were allegedly acting in retaliation for America's support of Israel, its involvement in the Persian Gulf War, and its continued military presence in the Middle East. Some of the terrorists had lived in the United States for more than a year and had taken flying lessons at American commercial flight schools. Others had slipped into the U.S. in the months before September 11 and acted as the "muscle" in the operation. The 19 terrorists easily smuggled box-cutters and knives through security at three East Coast airports and boarded four flights bound for California, chosen because the planes were loaded with fuel for the long transcontinental journey. Soon after takeoff, the terrorists commandeered the four planes and took the controls, transforming the ordinary commuter jets into guided missiles.

As millions watched in horror the events unfolding in New York, American Airlines Flight 77 circled over downtown Washington and slammed into the west side of the Pentagon military headquarters at 9:45 a.m. Jet fuel from the Boeing 757 caused a devastating inferno that led to a structural collapse of a portion of the giant concrete building. All told, 125 military personnel and civilians were killed in the Pentagon along with all 64 people aboard the airliner.

Less than 15 minutes after the terrorists struck the nerve center of the U.S. military, the horror in New York took a catastrophic turn for the worse when the south tower of the World Trade Center collapsed in a massive cloud of dust and smoke. The structural steel of the skyscraper, built to withstand winds in excess of 200 mph and a large conventional fire, could not withstand the tremendous heat generated by the burning jet fuel. At 10:30 a.m., the other Trade Center tower collapsed. Close to 3,000 people died in the World Trade Center and its vicinity, including a staggering 343 firefighters and paramedics, 23 New York City police officers, and 37 Port Authority police officers who were struggling to complete an evacuation of the buildings and save the office workers trapped on higher floors. Only six people in the World Trade Center towers at the time of their collapse survived. Almost 10,000 other people were treated for injuries, many severe.

Meanwhile, a fourth California-bound plane--United Flight 93--was hijacked about 40 minutes after leaving Newark International Airport in New Jersey. Because the plane had been delayed in taking off, passengers on board learned of events in New York and Washington via cell phone and Airfone calls to the ground. Knowing that the aircraft was not returning to an airport as the hijackers claimed, a group of passengers and flight attendants planned an insurrection. One of the passengers, Thomas Burnett, Jr., told his wife over the phone that "I know we're all going to die. There's three of us who are going to do something about it. I love you, honey." Another passenger--Todd Beamer--was heard saying "Are you guys ready? Let's roll" over an open line. Sandy Bradshaw, a flight attendant, called her husband and explained that she had slipped into a galley and was filling pitchers with boiling water. Her last words to him were "Everyone's running to first class. I've got to go. Bye."

The passengers fought the four hijackers and are suspected to have attacked the cockpit with a fire extinguisher. The plane then flipped over and sped toward the ground at upwards of 500 miles per hour, crashing in a rural field in western Pennsylvania at 10:10 a.m. All 45 people aboard were killed. Its intended target is not known, but theories include the White House, the U.S. Capitol, the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland, or one of several nuclear power plants along the eastern seaboard.

At 7 p.m., President George W. Bush, who had spent the day being shuttled around the country because of security concerns, returned to the White House. At 9 p.m., he delivered a televised address from the Oval Office, declaring "Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America. These acts shatter steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve." In a reference to the eventual U.S. military response he declared: "We will make no distinction between the terrorists who committed these acts and those who harbor them."

Operation Enduring Freedom, the U.S.-led international effort to oust the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and destroy Osama bin Laden's terrorist network based there, began on October 7, 2001. Bin Laden was killed during a raid of his compound in Pakistan by U.S. forces on May 2, 2011.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 11, 2014 3:01:18 AM

1972 – San Francisco’s BART opened to passenger service.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:14,693
Points:3,262,040
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Sep 10, 2014 11:35:58 PM

Roger Maris (1934): Baseball player who beat Babe Ruth’s homerun record with 61 runs on October 1, 1961. Maris grew up in North Dakota, and played baseball in the American Legion during the summer. Giving up a college scholarship, Maris decided to turn pro fresh out of high school. He signed with the Cleveland Indians, but was traded to the New York Yankees after the 1959 season. He would lead the team straight into the history books along side another famous slugger, Mickey Mantle. Maris and Mantle set a homerun record for teammates, hitting 115 runs in 1961. Maris’ number (#9) was retired in 1984. He passed away from lymphoma in 1985, at the age of 51.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 10, 2014 10:32:48 AM

1846: Elias Howe of Massachusetts received a patent for his sewing machine.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 10, 2014 9:14:11 AM

* 1897 - A London cabdriver named George Smith slams his taxi into a building and is the first person to be arrested for drunk driving. He pled guilty and was fined 25 shillings.

Police officers knew that Smith was drunk because he acted drunk (he had driven that cab into a wall, after all) and because he said he was, but what they lacked was a scientific way to prove someone was too intoxicated to drive, even if he or she wouldn't admit it. Blood tests were soon introduced, but those were messy and needed to be performed by a doctor; there were urine tests, but those were even messier, not to mention unreliable and expensive. In 1931, a toxicologist at Indiana University named Rolla Harger came up with a solution--a device he called the Drunkometer. It was simple: all the suspected drinker had to do was blow into a balloon. The tester then attached the balloon to a tube filled with a purple fluid (potassium permanganate and sulfuric acid) and released its air into the tube. Alcohol on a person's breath changed the color of the fluid from purple to yellow; the quicker the change, the drunker the person.

The Drunkometer was effective but cumbersome, and it required a certain amount of scientific calculation to determine just how much alcohol a person had consumed. In 1954, another Indianan named Robert Borkenstein invented a device that was more portable and easier to use. Borkenstein's machine, the Breathalyzer, worked much like Harger's did--it measured the amount of alcohol in a person's breath--but it did the necessary calculations automatically and thus could not be foiled or tampered with. (One tipsy Canadian famously ate his underwear while waiting to take a Breathalyzer test because he believed that the cotton would somehow absorb the alcohol in his system. It did not.) The Breathalyzer soon became standard equipment in every police car in the nation.

Even in the age of the Breathalyzer, drunk driving remained a problem. In 2007, more than 1.4 million drivers were arrested for driving while intoxicated, and a Centers for Disease Control survey found that Americans drove drunk 159 million times. That same year, about 13,000 people--more than 30 percent of all traffic fatalities--died in accidents involving a drunk driver.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 9, 2014 11:48:08 AM

1976 - New Zealand government establishes the country’s first centralised electronic database through the Wanganui Computer Act, raising questions about the state’s ability to gather information on its citizens
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 9, 2014 9:58:21 AM

* 1966 - President Lyndon Johnson signs the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act into law. Immediately afterward, he signed the Highway Safety Act. The two bills made the federal government responsible for setting and enforcing safety standards for cars and roads. Unsafe highways, Johnson argued, were a menace to public health: "In this century," Johnson said before he signed the bills, "more than 1,500,000 of our fellow citizens have died on our streets and highways; nearly three times as many Americans as we have lost in all our wars." It was a genuine crisis, and one that the automakers had proven themselves unwilling or unable to resolve. "Safety is no luxury item," the President declared, "no optional extra; it must be a normal cost of doing business."

Individual drivers were beyond the federal government's control--if you wanted to run a red light there was not much LBJ could do to stop you, after all--but by the mid-1960s, many reformers and safety experts (like Ralph Nader, whose book "Unsafe at Any Speed" had been selling briskly for almost two years by the time Johnson signed the NTMVSA) were beginning to argue that there were things the government could do to make the roads less dangerous. Automakers, these safety advocates argued, had the technology and the know-how to build stronger, sturdier cars and trucks that could keep people safe in case of an accident--and could even help prevent accidents altogether.

Though the car companies' lobbyists managed to water down the safety standards in the final bill considerably, the NTMVSA did result in hardier cars: it required seat belts for every passenger, impact-absorbing steering wheels, rupture-resistant fuel tanks, door latches that stayed latched in crashes, side-view mirrors, shatter-resistant windshields and windshield defrosters, lights on the sides of cars as well as the front and back, and "the padding and softening of interior surfaces and protrusions." (For its part, the Highway Safety Act required that roadbuilders install guardrails, better streetlights, and stronger barriers between opposing lanes of traffic.)

By any measure, the NTMVSA has been a success: Since its passage, the law--and especially its seat-belt provisions--has saved hundreds of thousands of lives.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 9, 2014 3:31:12 AM

1791 – Washington DC was named after President George Washington.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 8, 2014 5:13:34 PM

* 1974 - In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office. Ford later defended this action before the House Judiciary Committee, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

The Watergate scandal erupted after it was revealed that Nixon and his aides had engaged in illegal activities during his reelection campaign--and then attempted to cover up evidence of wrongdoing. With impeachment proceedings underway against him in Congress, Nixon bowed to public pressure and became the first American president to resign. At noon on August 9, Nixon officially ended his term, departing with his family in a helicopter from the White House lawn. Minutes later, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the United States in the East Room of the White House. After taking the oath of office, President Ford spoke to the nation in a television address, declaring, "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over."

Ford, the first president who came to the office through appointment rather than election, had replaced Spiro Agnew as vice president only eight months before. In a political scandal independent of the Nixon administration's wrongdoings in the Watergate affair, Agnew had been forced to resign in disgrace after he was charged with income tax evasion and political corruption. Exactly one month after Nixon announced his resignation, Ford issued the former president a "full, free and absolute" pardon for any crimes he committed while in office. The pardon was widely condemned at the time.

Decades later, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation presented its 2001 Profile in Courage Award to Gerald Ford for his 1974 pardon of Nixon. In pardoning Nixon, said the foundation, Ford placed his love of country ahead of his own political future and brought needed closure to the divisive Watergate affair. Ford left politics after losing the 1976 presidential election to Democrat Jimmy Carter. Ford died on December 26, 2006, at the age of 93.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 8, 2014 10:37:25 AM

1930 - 1st appearance of comic strip "Blondie"
Profile Pic
frankbank
Champion Author Delaware

Posts:8,341
Points:1,262,345
Joined:Jan 2009
Message Posted: Sep 8, 2014 4:34:55 AM

This Day in Delaware History: September 8

1944 2nd Lt. Gilbert B. Willis of Dover was killed while piloting his plane on a raid over Germany.

1954 It was announced that several African American students would integrate Dover schools and they did so without fanfare.

1991 Maynard H. Mires, Sr., 97, the last surviving member of the John Philip Sousa band, died in Lewes.

2005 Gasoline prices reached $3.23 at the pump in Delaware.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 8, 2014 3:11:43 AM

1930 – 3M began to market Scotch Transparent Tape.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 7, 2014 5:14:14 PM

* 1813 - The United States gets its nickname, Uncle Sam. The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812. Wilson (1766-1854) stamped the barrels with "U.S." for United States, but soldiers began referring to the grub as "Uncle Sam's." The local newspaper picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained widespread acceptance as the nickname for the U.S. federal government.

In the late 1860s and 1870s, political cartoonist Thomas Nast (1840-1902) began popularizing the image of Uncle Sam. Nast continued to evolve the image, eventually giving Sam the white beard and stars-and-stripes suit that are associated with the character today. The German-born Nast was also credited with creating the modern image of Santa Claus as well as coming up with the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party and the elephant as a symbol for the Republicans. Nast also famously lampooned the corruption of New York City's Tammany Hall in his editorial cartoons and was, in part, responsible for the downfall of Tammany leader William Tweed.

Perhaps the most famous image of Uncle Sam was created by artist James Montgomery Flagg (1877-1960). In Flagg's version, Uncle Sam wears a tall top hat and blue jacket and is pointing straight ahead at the viewer. During World War I, this portrait of Sam with the words "I Want You For The U.S. Army" was used as a recruiting poster. The image, which became immensely popular, was first used on the cover of Leslie's Weekly in July 1916 with the title "What Are You Doing for Preparedness?" The poster was widely distributed and has subsequently been re-used numerous times with different captions.

In September 1961, the U.S. Congress recognized Samuel Wilson as "the progenitor of America's national symbol of Uncle Sam." Wilson died at age 88 in 1854, and was buried next to his wife Betsey Mann in the Oakwood Cemetery in Troy, New York, the town that calls itself "The Home of Uncle Sam."

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 7, 2014 12:00:59 PM

1916 - WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION Act passed by Congress
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 7, 2014 3:03:29 AM

1921 – The first Miss America Pageant was held in Atlantic City.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 6, 2014 5:21:21 PM

* 1915 - A prototype tank nicknamed Little Willie rolls off the assembly line in England. Little Willie was far from an overnight success. It weighed 14 tons, got stuck in trenches and crawled over rough terrain at only two miles per hour. However, improvements were made to the original prototype and tanks eventually transformed military battlefields.

The British developed the tank in response to the trench warfare of World War I. In 1914, a British army colonel named Ernest Swinton and William Hankey, secretary of the Committee for Imperial Defence, championed the idea of an armored vehicle with conveyor-belt-like tracks over its wheels that could break through enemy lines and traverse difficult territory. The men appealed to British navy minister Winston Churchill, who believed in the concept of a "land boat" and organized a Landships Committee to begin developing a prototype. To keep the project secret from enemies, production workers were reportedly told the vehicles they were building would be used to carry water on the battlefield (alternate theories suggest the shells of the new vehicles resembled water tanks). Either way, the new vehicles were shipped in crates labeled "tank" and the name stuck.

The first tank prototype, Little Willie, was unveiled in September 1915. Following its underwhelming performance--it was slow, became overheated and couldn’t cross trenches--a second prototype, known as "Big Willie," was produced. By 1916, this armored vehicle was deemed ready for battle and made its debut at the First Battle of the Somme near Courcelette, France, on September 15 of that year. Known as the Mark I, this first batch of tanks was hot, noisy and unwieldy and suffered mechanical malfunctions on the battlefield; nevertheless, people realized the tank's potential. Further design improvements were made and at the Battle of Cambrai in November 1917, 400 Mark IV’s proved much more successful than the Mark I, capturing 8,000 enemy troops and 100 guns.

Tanks rapidly became an important military weapon. During World War II, they played a prominent role across numerous battlefields. More recently, tanks have been essential for desert combat during the conflicts in the Persian Gulf.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 6, 2014 10:43:37 AM

1920 - Jack Dempsey KOs Billy Miske in 3 for heavyweight boxing title 1st radio broadcast of a prizefight
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 6, 2014 3:04:07 AM

1997 – Funeral of Princess Diana. A million people lined the streets while over two billion watched on TV.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 5, 2014 5:26:39 PM

* 1836 - Sam Houston is elected as president of the Republic of Texas, which earned its independence from Mexico in a successful military rebellion.

Born in Virginia in 1793, Houston moved with his family to rural Tennessee after his father's death; as a teenager, he ran away and lived for several years with the Cherokee tribe. Houston served in the War of 1812 and was later appointed by the U.S. government to manage the removal of the Cherokee from Tennessee to a reservation in Arkansas Territory. He practiced law in Nashville and from 1823 to1827 served as a U.S. congressman before being elected governor of Tennessee in 1827.

A brief, failed marriage led Houston to resign from office and live again with the Cherokee. Officially adopted by the tribe, he traveled to Washington to protest governmental treatment of Native Americans. In 1832, President Andrew Jackson sent him to Texas (then a Mexican province) to negotiate treaties with local Native Americans for protection of border traders. Houston arrived in Texas during a time of rising tensions between U.S. settlers and Mexican authorities, and soon emerged as a leader among the settlers. In 1835, Texans formed a provisional government, which issued a declaration of independence from Mexico the following year. At that time, Houston was appointed military commander of the Texas army.

Though the rebellion suffered a crushing blow at the Alamo in early 1836, Houston was soon able to turn his army's fortunes around. On April 21, he led some 800 Texans in a surprise defeat of 1,500 Mexican soldiers under General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna at the San Jacinto River. Santa Anna was captured and brought to Houston, where he was forced to sign an armistice that would grant Texas its freedom. After receiving medical treatment for his war wounds in New Orleans, Houston returned to win election as president of the Republic of Texas on September 5. In victory, Houston declared that "Texas will again lift its head and stand among the nations....It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with it in natural advantages."

Houston served as the republic's president until 1838, then again from 1841 to 1844. Despite plans for retirement, Houston helped Texas win admission to the United States in 1845 and was elected as one of the state's first two senators. He served three terms in the Senate and ran successfully for Texas' governorship in 1859. As the Civil War loomed, Houston argued unsuccessfully against secession, and was deposed from office in March 1861 after refusing to swear allegiance to the Confederacy. He died of pneumonia in 1863.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 5, 2014 12:34:59 PM

1980 - World's longest road tunnel, St Gotthard in Swiss Alps, opens
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 5, 2014 3:05:06 AM

1882 –The nation’s first Labor Day Parade was held in New York City.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 4, 2014 3:31:07 PM

1950 - D McI Hodgson of St Ann Bay, Nova Scotia catches a 997 lb tuna
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 4, 2014 3:02:06 AM

2001 – Tokyo DisneySea opened to the public as part of Tokyo Disney Resort in Uraya Chiba, Japan. It was the second theme park to open at Tokyo DisneySea and the ninth park of the eleven worldwide Disney Theme Parks to open. It is the most expensive theme park to ever have been built at over $4 billion.

[Edited by: lvskyguy at 9/4/2014 3:03:20 AM EST]
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 4, 2014 2:11:11 AM

* 1957 - "E-Day," according to its advertising campaign--the Ford Motor Company unveils the Edsel, the first new automobile brand produced by one of the Big Three car companies since 1938. (Although many people call it the "Ford Edsel," in fact Edsel was a division all its own, like Lincoln or Mercury.) Thirteen hundred independent Edsel dealers offered four models for sale: the smaller Pacer and Ranger and the larger Citation and Corsair.

To many people, the Edsel serves as a symbol of corporate hubris at its worst: it was an over-hyped, over-sized, over-designed monstrosity. Other people believe the car was simply a victim of bad timing. When Ford executives began planning for the company's new brand, the economy was booming and people were snapping up enormous gas-guzzlers as fast as automakers could build them. By the time the Edsel hit showrooms, however, the economic outlook was bad and getting worse. People didn't want big, glitzy fin cars anymore; they wanted small, efficient ones instead. The Edsel was just ostentatious and expensive enough to give buyers pause.

At the same time, there is probably no car in the world that could have lived up to the Edsel's hype. For months, the company had been running ads that simply pictured the car's hood ornament and the line "The Edsel Is Coming." Everything else about the car was top-secret: If dealers failed to keep their Edsels hidden, they'd lose their franchise. For the great E-Day unveiling, promotions and prizes--like a giveaway of 1,000 ponies--lured shoppers to showrooms.

When they got there, they found a car that had a distinctive look indeed--but not necessarily in a good way. Thanks to the big impact ring or "horse collar" in the middle of its front grille, it looked (one reporter said) like "a Pontiac pushing a toilet seat." (Another called it "an Oldsmobile sucking a lemon.") And its problems were more than cosmetic. Drivers changed gears by pushing buttons on the steering wheel, a system that was not easy to figure out. In addition, at highway speeds that famous hood ornament had a tendency to fly off and into the windshield.

In its first year, Edsel sold just 64,000 cars and lost $250 million ($2.5 billion today). After the 1960 model year, the company folded.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 3, 2014 10:39:00 AM

1855 - Indian Wars: In Nebraska, 700 soldiers under American General William S. Harney avenge the Grattan Massacre by attacking a Sioux village, killing 100 unarmed men, women, and children. Cowards!!!

Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 3, 2014 8:39:30 AM

* 1777 - The American flag is flown in battle for the first time, during a Revolutionary War skirmish at Cooch's Bridge, Maryland. Patriot General William Maxwell ordered the stars and strips banner raised as a detachment of his infantry and cavalry met an advance guard of British and Hessian troops. The rebels were defeated and forced to retreat to General George Washington's main force near Brandywine Creek in Pennsylvania.

Three months before, on June 14, the Continental Congress adopted a resolution stating that "the flag of the United States be thirteen alternate stripes red and white" and that "the Union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation." The national flag, which became known as the "Stars and Stripes," was based on the "Grand Union" flag, a banner carried by the Continental Army in 1776 that also consisted of 13 red and white stripes. According to legend, Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross designed the new canton for the Stars and Stripes, which consisted of a circle of 13 stars and a blue background, at the request of General George Washington. Historians have been unable to conclusively prove or disprove this legend.

With the entrance of new states into the United States after independence, new stripes and stars were added to represent new additions to the Union. In 1818, however, Congress enacted a law stipulating that the 13 original stripes be restored and that only stars be added to represent new states.

On June 14, 1877, the first Flag Day observance was held on the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the Stars and Stripes. As instructed by Congress, the U.S. flag was flown from all public buildings across the country. In the years after the first Flag Day, several states continued to observe the anniversary, and in 1949 Congress officially designated June 14 as Flag Day, a national day of observance.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 3, 2014 3:01:28 AM

1971 – Qatar became an independent State. The Capital and largest city is Doha.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:3,369
Points:597,865
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Sep 2, 2014 10:43:36 AM

1982 - Rolling Stone Keith Richard's house burns down
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 2, 2014 8:22:40 AM

* 1959 - At a news conference broadcast to viewers in 21 cities on closed-circuit television, Henry Ford II introduces his company's newest car--the 90-horsepower, 30 miles-per-gallon Falcon. The Falcon, dubbed "the small car with the big car feel," was an overnight success. It went on sale that October 8 and by October 9, dealers had snapped up every one of the 97,000 cars in the first production run.

In 1959, each one of Detroit's Big Three automakers began to sell a smaller, zippier, lower-priced car: Ford had the Falcon, while General Motors had the Corvair and Chevrolet had the Valiant. After years of building huge, gas-guzzling, lavishly be-finned cars, American companies entered the small-car market because European carmakers like Volkswagen, Fiat, and Renault were selling their little cars to American buyers by the thousands. (Foreign-car sales in the United States had jumped 1,060 percent since 1954 and accounted for about 10 percent of the nation's new-car sales.) Executives in Detroit hoped that cars like the Falcon would "drive the imports back to their shores."

Mostly, people liked these smaller cars because they were inexpensive. The Falcon cost about $1,900 (about $14,029 in today's dollars)--still much more expensive than even the priciest of the European imports (the Triumph and the Simca sold for about $1,600, while a Fiat, the cheapest car you could buy, cost about $1,000), but more affordable than any other American car. In addition, more fuel-efficient cars like the Falcon also saved their drivers money on gas.

Many people believed that the introduction of American compact cars would permanently transform the automobile industry. The "desire of American car buyers for sensible automobiles," one industry executive told a reporter, would soon make big, inefficient cars obsolete. Unfortunately, though the Falcon was an immediate sensation--Ford sold more than a million of them in the car's first two years on the market, and its design went on to inspire the iconic Ford Mustang--this did not prove to be the case. Today, small cars account for less than 20 percent of new-car sales.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:6,992
Points:958,410
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Sep 2, 2014 3:01:24 AM

1963 – CBS Evening News became the first half-hour televised news program, being extended from 15 to 30 minutes.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:14,693
Points:3,262,040
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Sep 1, 2014 11:33:00 PM

1799 - The Bank of Manhattan Company opened in New York City, NY. It was the forerunner of Chase Manhattan.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:22,057
Points:4,429,830
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Sep 1, 2014 5:10:54 PM

* 1998 - The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 finally goes into effect. The law required that all cars and light trucks sold in the United States have air bags on both sides of the front seat.

Inspired by the inflatable protective covers on Navy torpedoes, an industrial engineering technician from Pennsylvania named John Hetrick patented a design for a "safety cushion assembly for automotive vehicles" in 1953. The next year, Hetrick sent sketches of his device to Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler, but the automakers never responded. Inflatable-safety-cushion technology languished until 1965, when Ralph Nader's book "Unsafe at Any Speed" speculated that seat belts and air bags together could prevent thousands of deaths in car accidents.

In 1966, Congress passed the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Act, which required automakers to put seat belts, but not air bags, in every car they built. Unfortunately, the law did not require people to use their seat belts, and only about 25 percent did. Air bags seemed like the perfect solution to this problem: They could protect drivers and passengers in car crashes whether they chose to buckle up or not.

While Ford and GM began to install air bags in some vehicles during the 1970s, some experts began to wonder if they caused more problems than they solved. When air bags inflated, they could hit people of smaller stature--and children in particular--so hard that they could be seriously hurt or even killed. A 1973 study suggested that three-point (lap and shoulder) seat belts were more effective and less risky than air bags anyway. But as air-bag technology improved, automakers began to install them in more and more vehicles, and by the time the 1991 law was passed, they were a fairly common feature in many cars. Still, the law gave carmakers time to overhaul their factories if necessary: It did not require passenger cars to have air bags until after September 1, 1997. (Truck manufacturers got an extra year to comply with the law).

Researchers estimate that air bags reduce the risk of dying in a head-on collision by 30 percent, and they agree that the bags have saved more than 10,000 lives since the late 1980s. (Many of those people were not wearing seat belts, which experts believe have saved more than 211,000 lives since 1975.) Today, they are standard equipment in almost 100 million cars and trucks.

Post a reply Back to Topics