Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    7:37 PM

Message Forum - Read Message

Category: Off Topic > Topics Add to favorite topics   Post new topicPost New Topic
Author Topic: This day in History Back to Topics
taztug

Champion Author
Wilmington

Posts:6,244
Points:1,300,210
Joined:Aug 2004
Message Posted: May 10, 2006 12:44:24 PM

On May 10th the following happend in the old west:

Tanscontinental Railroad
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 18, 2015 1:06:53 PM

WWI: French Pilot Roland Garros Lands Behind Enemy Lines (1915)
One of the first flying aces in history, Roland Garros was a French aviator and WWI fighter pilot. Early in the war, Garros fitted a machine gun to the front of his plane so that he could shoot while flying and soon downed three German aircrafts. While on a mission in 1915, his fuel line clogged, and he was forced to land behind German lines. He was captured and held as a prisoner of war until 1918, when he managed to escape and rejoin the French army.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 18, 2015 11:11:34 AM

* 1906 - At 5:13 a.m., an earthquake estimated at close to 8.0 on the Richter scale strikes San Francisco, California, killing hundreds of people as it topples numerous buildings. The quake was caused by a slip of the San Andreas Fault over a segment about 275 miles long, and shock waves could be felt from southern Oregon down to Los Angeles.

San Francisco’s brick buildings and wooden Victorian structures were especially devastated. Fires immediately broke out and–because broken water mains prevented firefighters from stopping them–firestorms soon developed citywide. At 7 a.m., U.S. Army troops from Fort Mason reported to the Hall of Justice, and San Francisco Mayor E.E. Schmitz called for the enforcement of a dusk-to-dawn curfew and authorized soldiers to shoot-to-kill anyone found looting. Meanwhile, in the face of significant aftershocks, firefighters and U.S. troops fought desperately to control the ongoing fire, often dynamiting whole city blocks to create firewalls. On April 20, 20,000 refugees trapped by the massive fire were evacuated from the foot of Van Ness Avenue onto the USS Chicago.

By April 23, most fires were extinguished, and authorities commenced the task of rebuilding the devastated metropolis. It was estimated that some 3,000 people died as a result of the Great San Francisco Earthquake and the devastating fires it inflicted upon the city. Almost 30,000 buildings were destroyed, including most of the city’s homes and nearly all the central business district.

Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 18, 2015 9:03:26 AM

1988 – The United States launches Operation Praying Mantis against Iranian naval forces in the largest naval battle since World War II.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 18, 2015 3:22:18 AM

A year ago today 16 people were killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:15,834
Points:3,569,895
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 11:18:58 PM

1524 - New York Harbor was discovered by Giovanni Verrazano.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 2:39:22 PM

* 1970 - With the world anxiously watching, Apollo 13, a U.S. lunar spacecraft that suffered a severe malfunction on its journey to the moon, safely returns to Earth.

On April 11, the third manned lunar landing mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying astronauts James A. Lovell, John L. Swigert, and Fred W. Haise. The mission was headed for a landing on the Fra Mauro highlands of the moon. However, two days into the mission, disaster struck 200,000 miles from Earth when oxygen tank No. 2 blew up in the spacecraft. Swigert reported to mission control on Earth, “Houston, we’ve had a problem here,” and it was discovered that the normal supply of oxygen, electricity, light, and water had been disrupted. The landing mission was aborted, and the astronauts and controllers on Earth scrambled to come up with emergency procedures. The crippled spacecraft continued to the moon, circled it, and began a long, cold journey back to Earth.

The astronauts and mission control were faced with enormous logistical problems in stabilizing the spacecraft and its air supply, as well as providing enough energy to the damaged fuel cells to allow successful reentry into Earth’s atmosphere. Navigation was another problem, and Apollo 13‘s course was repeatedly corrected with dramatic and untested maneuvers. On April 17, tragedy turned to triumph as the Apollo 13 astronauts touched down safely in the Pacific Ocean.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 10:16:40 AM

Bay of Pigs Invasion Begins (1961)
The ill-fated Bay of Pigs invasion was a US-supported invasion of Cuba by an armed force of approximately 1,500 Cuban exiles attempting to overthrow the government of Fidel Castro. Trained and armed by the US government, the rebels intended to foment an insurrection in Cuba, but the rebellion never materialized and the Cuban army defeated the invading forces in a matter of days. An internal CIA report investigating the incident later identified
Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 9:41:06 AM

1986 – The Three Hundred and Thirty Five Years' War between the Netherlands and the Isles of Scilly ends.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 17, 2015 3:30:05 AM

2013 – A fertilizer plant in West, Texas exploded and killed 15 people, injured 160.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 16, 2015 10:09:26 AM

Masada Falls to the Romans, Ending Jewish Revolt (73 CE)
Masada is an ancient mountaintop fortress in Israel's Judaean Desert. In 66 CE, with the outbreak of the Jewish war against Rome, the Zealots, an extremist Jewish sect, seized the fortress in a surprise attack and massacred its Roman garrison. After the fall of Jerusalem, Masada, the last remnant of Jewish rule, refused to surrender. Masada remained under Zealot control until 73 CE, when, after months of siege, the Romans finally breached the walls.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 16, 2015 9:57:46 AM

* 1943 - In Basel, Switzerland, Albert Hoffman, a Swiss chemist working at the Sandoz pharmaceutical research laboratory, accidentally consumes LSD-25, a synthetic drug he had created in 1938 as part of his research into the medicinal value of lysergic acid compounds. After taking the drug, formally known as lysergic acid diethylamide, Dr. Hoffman was disturbed by unusual sensations and hallucinations. In his notes, he related the experience:

“Last Friday, April 16, 1943, I was forced to interrupt my work in the laboratory in the middle of the afternoon and proceed home, being affected by a remarkable restlessness, combined with a slight dizziness. At home I lay down and sank into a not unpleasant, intoxicated-like condition characterized by an extremely stimulated imagination. In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors. After some two hours this condition faded away.”

After intentionally taking the drug again to confirm that it had caused this strange physical and mental state, Dr. Hoffman published a report announcing his discovery, and so LSD made its entry into the world as a hallucinogenic drug. Widespread use of the so-called “mind-expanding” drug did not begin until the 1960s, when counterculture figures such as Albert M. Hubbard, Timothy Leary, and Ken Kesey publicly expounded on the benefits of using LSD as a recreational drug. The manufacture, sale, possession, and use of LSD, known to cause negative reactions in some of those who take it, were made illegal in the United States in 1965.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 16, 2015 4:35:15 AM

1962 – Walter Cronkite became lead news anchor of CBS Evening News.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:15,834
Points:3,569,895
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Apr 15, 2015 10:06:53 PM

Elizabeth Montgomery (1933): Late actress who made her television debut in 1951 on her father's playhouse series "Robert Montgomery Presents." Her notable early film roles were in the films The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell in 1955 and Johnny Cool in 1963. She is best remembered, however, for her leading role as Samantha, the witch who would cast spells with the twitch of her nose, on the 1960s television sitcom "Bewitched." Following the conclusion of "Bewitched," her first and only TV series, Montgomery turned to made-for-TV movies, many of which won critical praise like A Case of Rape (1974), The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975) and Black Widow Murders (1993). She also narrated the movie The Panama Deception which won an Academy Award® in 1993. Elizabeth died of cancer in 1995.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 15, 2015 4:22:31 PM

Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language Published (1755)
Written by literary scholar Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language was the first comprehensive English lexicographical work ever undertaken and is among the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language. Remarkably, Johnson completed the work nearly single-handedly over a period of nine years. Unlike most modern lexicographers, he introduced humor into a number of his more than 42,000 definitions.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 15, 2015 10:30:05 AM

* 1912 - The RMS Titanic, billed as unsinkable, sinks into the icy waters of the North Atlantic after hitting an iceberg on its maiden voyage, killing 1,517 people.

The United Kingdom’s White Star Line built the Titanic to be the most luxurious cruise ship in the world. It was nearly 900 feet long and more than 100 feet high. The Titanic could reach speeds of 30 knots and was thought to be the world’s fastest ship. With its individualized watertight compartments, it was seen as virtually unsinkable.On its first voyage, from Southampton, England, to New York with stops in Cherbourg, France, and Queenstown, Ireland, the Titanic was carrying 2,206 people, including a crew of 898. A relatively mild winter had produced a bumper crop of icebergs in the North Atlantic, but the crew, believing their ship was unsinkable, paid scant attention to warnings.On the night of Sunday, April 14, other ships in the area reported icebergs by radio, but their messages were not delivered to the bridge or the captain of the Titanic. The iceberg that struck the ship was spotted at 11:40 p.m. Although a dead-on collision was avoided, the Titanic‘s starboard side violently scraped the iceberg, ripping open six compartments. The ship’s design could withstand only four compartments flooding.Minutes later, the crew radioed for help, sending out an SOS signal, the first time the new type of help signal was used. Ten minutes after midnight, the order for passengers to head for the lifeboats was given. Unfortunately, there were only lifeboats for about half of the people on board. Additionally, there had been no instruction or drills regarding such a procedure and general panic broke out on deck.The survivors–those who successfully made it onto the lifeboats–were largely women who were traveling first class. In fact, the third-class passengers were not even allowed onto the deck until the first-class female passengers had abandoned the ship. White Star President Bruce Ismay jumped onto the last lifeboat though there were women and children still waiting to board.At 2:20 a.m., the Titanic finally sank. Breaking in half, it plunged downward to the sea floor. Captain Edward Smith went down with the ship. The Carpathia arrived about an hour later and rescued the 705 people who made it onto the lifeboats. The people who were forced into the cold waters all perished.Official blame for the tragedy was placed on the captain and bridge crew, all of whom had died. In the wake of the accident, significant safety-improvement measures were established, including a requirement that the number of lifeboats on board a ship reflect the entire number of passengers. The sinking of the Titanic has become a legendary story about the dangers of hubris.In 1985, after many attempts over many years, divers were finally able to locate the wreckage of the Titanic on the floor of the North Atlantic.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 15, 2015 3:18:31 AM

1955 – The first franchised McDonald’s opened in Des Plaines, Illinois.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:15,834
Points:3,569,895
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 11:54:15 PM

2015 - Percy Sledge, who soared from part-time singer and hospital orderly to lasting fame with his aching, forlorn performance on the classic "When a Man Loves a Woman," died in Louisiana. He was 74.

His family said in a statement released through his manager, Mark Lyman, that he died "peacefully" at his home in Baton Rouge after a yearlong struggle with cancer. The cause of death was liver failure, Lyman said.

A No. 1 hit in 1966, "When a Man Loves a Woman" was Sledge's debut single, an almost unbearably heartfelt ballad with a resonance he never approached again. Few singers could have. Its mood set by a mournful organ and dirge-like tempo, "When a Man Loves a Woman" was for many the definitive soul ballad, a testament of blinding, all-consuming love haunted by fear and graced by overwhelming emotion.

The song was a personal triumph for Sledge, who seemed on the verge of sobbing throughout the production, and a breakthrough for Southern soul. It was the first No. 1 hit from the burgeoning Muscle Shoals music scene in northern Alabama, where Aretha Franklin and the Rolling Stones among others would record, and the first gold record for Atlantic Records.
Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 12:00:18 PM

2003 – U.S. troops in Baghdad capture Abu Abbas, leader of the Palestinian group that killed an American on the hijacked cruise liner the MS Achille Lauro in 1985.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 10:53:28 AM

Public Kinetoscope Parlor Opens in New York (1894)
The kinetoscope is an early motion picture exhibition device that creates the illusion of movement by conveying a filmstrip of sequential images over a light source with a high-speed shutter. The first public kinetoscope parlor was opened in New York City in 1894 and introduced the basic approach that would become the standard for all cinematic projection before the advent of video. The venue had 10 machines, each showing a different short movie.
Profile Pic
car54BC
Champion Author British Columbia

Posts:5,505
Points:2,069,770
Joined:May 2008
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 10:14:01 AM

Better start paying attention
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 10:12:08 AM

* 1912 - Just before midnight in the North Atlantic, the RMS Titanic fails to divert its course from an iceberg, ruptures its hull, and begins to sink.

Four days earlier, the Titanic, one of the largest and most luxurious ocean liners ever built, departed Southampton, England, on its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. While leaving port, the massive ship came within a couple of feet of the steamer New York but passed safely by, causing a general sigh of relief from the passengers massed on the ship’s decks.

The Titanic was designed by the Irish shipbuilder William Pirrie and spanned 883 feet from stern to bow. Its hull was divided into 16 compartments that were presumed to be watertight. Because four of these compartments could be flooded without causing a critical loss of buoyancy, the Titanic was considered unsinkable. On its first journey across the highly competitive Atlantic ferry route, the ship carried some 2,200 passengers and crew.

After stopping at Cherbourg, France, and Queenstown, Ireland, to pick up some final passengers, the massive vessel set out at full speed for New York City. However, just before midnight on April 14, the ship hit an iceberg, and five of the Titanic‘s compartments were ruptured along its starboard side. At about 2:20 a.m. on the morning of April 15, the massive vessel sank into the North Atlantic.

Because of a shortage of lifeboats and the lack of satisfactory emergency procedures, more than 1,500 people went down in the sinking ship or froze to death in the icy North Atlantic waters. Most of the approximately 700 survivors were women and children. A number of notable American and British citizens died in the tragedy, including the noted British journalist William Thomas Stead and heirs to the Straus, Astor, and Guggenheim fortunes. The announcement of details of the disaster led to outrage on both sides of the Atlantic. The sinking of the Titanic did have some positive effects, however, as more stringent safety regulations were adopted on public ships, and regular patrols were initiated to trace the locations of deadly Atlantic icebergs.
Profile Pic
WES03
Champion Author Maryland

Posts:7,818
Points:2,010,210
Joined:Feb 2009
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 9:13:58 AM

1865 - Lincoln shot at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C. by John Wilkes Booth.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 3:26:14 AM

1939 – The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck was published by Viking Press.
Profile Pic
jPnam68
All-Star Author New Hampshire

Posts:561
Points:592,800
Joined:Jun 2012
Message Posted: Apr 14, 2015 12:30:27 AM

1912 - The Atlantic passenger liner Titanic, on its maiden voyage hit an iceberg @ 11:40 PM and began to sink. 1,517 people lost their lives and more than 700 survived.
Profile Pic
Joisygal
Champion Author New Jersey

Posts:15,834
Points:3,569,895
Joined:Jul 2005
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 11:10:35 PM

1870 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in New York City.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 11:26:53 AM

Jallianwala Bagh Massacre (1919)
Named for the enclosed park where it took place, the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre occurred in India on April 13, 1919, when British troops under the command of General Reginald Dyer opened fire without warning on a crowd of roughly 10,000 Indians protesting the arrest of two Indian National Congress leaders. At least 379 demonstrators were killed and another 1,200 were wounded during the barrage, which is said to have lasted 10 minutes.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 9:52:37 AM

* 1861 - After a 33-hour bombardment by Confederate cannons, Union forces surrender Fort Sumter in South Carolina’s Charleston Harbor. The first engagement of the war ended in Rebel victory.

The surrender concluded a standoff that began with South Carolina’s secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. When President Abraham Lincoln sent word to Charleston in early April that he planned to send food to the beleaguered garrison, the Confederates took action. They opened fire on Sumter in the predawn of April 12. Over the next day, nearly 4,000 rounds were hurled toward the black silhouette of Fort Sumter.

Inside Sumter was its commander, Major Robert Anderson, 9 officers, 68 enlisted men, 8 musicians, and 43 construction workers who were still putting the finishing touches on the fort. Union Captain Abner Doubleday, the man often inaccurately credited with inventing the game of baseball, returned fire nearly two hours after the barrage began. By the morning of April 13, the garrison in Sumter was in dire straits. The soldiers had sustained only minor injuries, but they could not hold out much longer. The fort was badly damaged, and the Confederate’s shots were becoming more precise. Around noon, the flagstaff was shot away. Louis Wigfall, a former U.S. senator from Texas, rowed out without permission to see if the garrison was trying to surrender. Anderson decided that further resistance was futile, and he ran a white flag up a makeshift flagpole.

The first engagement of the war was over, and the only casualty had been a Confederate horse. The Union force was allowed to leave for the north; before leaving, the soldiers fired a 100-gun salute. During the salute, one soldier was killed and another mortally wounded by a prematurely exploding cartridge. The Civil War had officially begun.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 3:30:32 AM

1796 – The first elephant from India arrived in the United States by Captain Jacob Crowninshield who purchased the 2 year old Asian elephant for $450. On April 23rd of that year, the elephant was placed on exhibit, to be viewed for 50 cents, and a man by the name of Owen offered to buy this elephant for $10,000. For 12 years, the elephant was exhibited all over the East coast with people paying 25 cents to see this animal.
Profile Pic
jPnam68
All-Star Author New Hampshire

Posts:561
Points:592,800
Joined:Jun 2012
Message Posted: Apr 13, 2015 12:22:07 AM

Christopher Walker was killed in a fight with police in New Hampshire. Walker was wanted as a suspect in the kidnappings of 11 young women in several states, 1984. New Hampshire Known as the "Live Free or Die" state. Guess he chose to die.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 12, 2015 2:05:14 PM

Record-Setting Wind Gust Recorded on Mt. Washington (1934)
The highest peak in the northeastern US, New Hampshire's Mount Washington is famous for its erratic weather, caused partly by the convergence of storm tracks from the South Atlantic, Gulf region, and Pacific Northwest. Winds exceeding hurricane force occur there an average of 110 days a year. It is also where the highest directly measured surface wind speed—not including tornadoes or hurricanes—was recorded: 231 mph (372 km/h).
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 12, 2015 10:19:00 AM

* 1861 - The bloodiest four years in American history begin when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina’s Charleston Bay. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern “insurrection.”

As early as 1858, the ongoing conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery had led Southern leadership to discuss a unified separation from the United States. By 1860, the majority of the slave states were publicly threatening secession if the Republicans, the anti-slavery party, won the presidency. Following Republican Abraham Lincoln’s victory over the divided Democratic Party in November 1860, South Carolina immediately initiated secession proceedings. On December 20, the South Carolina legislature passed the “Ordinance of Secession,” which declared that “the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other states, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved.” After the declaration, South Carolina set about seizing forts, arsenals, and other strategic locations within the state. Within six weeks, five more Southern states–Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana–had followed South Carolina’s lead.

In February 1861, delegates from those states convened to establish a unified government. Jefferson Davis of Mississippi was subsequently elected the first president of the Confederate States of America. When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, a total of seven states (Texas had joined the pack) had seceded from the Union, and federal troops held only Fort Sumter in South Carolina, Fort Pickens off the Florida coast, and a handful of minor outposts in the South. Four years after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers dead.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 12, 2015 3:36:31 AM

1955 – The polio vaccine was developed by Dr. Jonas Salk.
Profile Pic
jPnam68
All-Star Author New Hampshire

Posts:561
Points:592,800
Joined:Jun 2012
Message Posted: Apr 12, 2015 12:24:42 AM

Bill Haley and Comets records "Rock Around Clock"
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 11, 2015 6:43:24 PM

Attempted Overthrow of Venezuelan President Chavez (2002)
In 2002, anger over Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's reform plans led to an attempted coup d'état. On April 11, Chavez was detained and Venezuelan Federation of Chambers of Commerce President Pedro Carmona was installed as interim president. Carmona quickly dissolved the National Assembly and the Supreme Court and voided Venezuela's constitution, but within 48 hours, the Presidential Guard retook the presidential palace, and Chavez was reinstalled as president.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 11, 2015 8:54:28 AM

* 1970 - Apollo 13, the third lunar landing mission, is successfully launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying astronauts James A. Lovell, John L. Swigert, and Fred W. Haise. The spacecraft’s destination was the Fra Mauro highlands of the moon, where the astronauts were to explore the Imbrium Basin and conduct geological experiments. After an oxygen tank exploded on the evening of April 13, however, the new mission objective became to get the Apollo 13 crew home alive.

At 9:00 p.m. EST on April 13, Apollo 13 was just over 200,000 miles from Earth. The crew had just completed a television broadcast and was inspecting Aquarius, the Landing Module (LM). The next day, Apollo 13 was to enter the moon’s orbit, and soon after, Lovell and Haise would become the fifth and sixth men to walk on the moon. At 9:08 p.m., these plans were shattered when an explosion rocked the spacecraft. Oxygen tank No. 2 had blown up, disabling the normal supply of oxygen, electricity, light, and water. Lovell reported to mission control: “Houston, we’ve had a problem here,” and the crew scrambled to find out what had happened. Several minutes later, Lovell looked out of the left-hand window and saw that the spacecraft was venting a gas, which turned out to be the Command Module’s (CM) oxygen. The landing mission was aborted.

As the CM lost pressure, its fuel cells also died, and one hour after the explosion mission control instructed the crew to move to the LM, which had sufficient oxygen, and use it as a lifeboat. The CM was shut down but would have to be brought back on-line for Earth reentry. The LM was designed to ferry astronauts from the orbiting CM to the moon’s surface and back again; its power supply was meant to support two people for 45 hours. If the crew of Apollo 13 were to make it back to Earth alive, the LM would have to support three men for at least 90 hours and successfully navigate more than 200,000 miles of space. The crew and mission control faced a formidable task.

To complete its long journey, the LM needed energy and cooling water. Both were to be conserved at the cost of the crew, who went on one-fifth water rations and would later endure cabin temperatures that hovered a few degrees above freezing. Removal of carbon dioxide was also a problem, because the square lithium hydroxide canisters from the CM were not compatible with the round openings in the LM environmental system. Mission control built an impromptu adapter out of materials known to be onboard, and the crew successfully copied their model.

Navigation was also a major problem. The LM lacked a sophisticated navigational system, and the astronauts and mission control had to work out by hand the changes in propulsion and direction needed to take the spacecraft home. On April 14, Apollo 13 swung around the moon. Swigert and Haise took pictures, and Lovell talked with mission control about the most difficult maneuver, a five-minute engine burn that would give the LM enough speed to return home before its energy ran out. Two hours after rounding the far side of the moon, the crew, using the sun as an alignment point, fired the LM’s small descent engine. The procedure was a success; Apollo 13 was on its way home.

For the next three days, Lovell, Haise, and Swigert huddled in the freezing lunar module. Haise developed a case of the flu. Mission control spent this time frantically trying to develop a procedure that would allow the astronauts to restart the CM for reentry. On April 17, a last-minute navigational correction was made, this time using Earth as an alignment guide. Then the repressurized CM was successfully powered up after its long, cold sleep. The heavily damaged service module was shed, and one hour before re-entry the LM was disengaged from the CM. Just before 1 p.m., the spacecraft reentered Earth’s atmosphere. Mission control feared that the CM’s heat shields were damaged in the accident, but after four minutes of radio silence Apollo 13‘s parachutes were spotted, and the astronauts splashed down safely into the Pacific Ocean.

Profile Pic
jPnam68
All-Star Author New Hampshire

Posts:561
Points:592,800
Joined:Jun 2012
Message Posted: Apr 11, 2015 3:27:24 AM

April 10, the 100th day of the year (101 in leap years)April 10th 1949 my birth, April 10th, 1963 USS Threasher lost of coast on Massachusetts, implodes and 129 men die.

http://www.gdeb.com/news/ebnews/PDF/ebnews_2013_03.pdf
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 11, 2015 3:04:47 AM

1968 – The Civil Rights Act of 1968 was sign by President Lyndon Johnson which prohibited discrimination in the sale, rental and financing of housing.
Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 10, 2015 12:19:27 PM

2014 – Kathleen Sebelius resigns as Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, in light of fallout from the botched rollout of HealthCare.gov.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 10, 2015 11:50:13 AM

10,500 Besieged Residents Flee Messolonghi (1826)
Messolonghi was a major stronghold of Greek insurgents in the Greek War of Independence. Its inhabitants successfully resisted a siege by forces of the Ottoman Empire in 1822 and 1823 and held out heroically against a second siege from 1825 to 1826, when the Ottomans captured the town. Facing starvation after a year of relentless attacks, the people of Messolonghi—approximately 10,500—finally decided to leave the beleaguered city on the night of April 10, 1826.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 10, 2015 11:06:16 AM

* 1933 - The Civilian Conservation Corps, a tool for employing young men and improving the government’s vast holdings of western land, is created in Washington, D.C.

One of the dozens of New Deal programs created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to fight the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was primarily designed to put thousands of unemployed young men to work on useful public projects. Roosevelt put the program under the direction of his Secretary of Interior, Harold Ickes, who became an enthusiastic supporter.

Since the vast majority of federal public land was in the West, Ickes created most of his CCC projects in that region. The young men who joined, however, came from all over the nation. It was the first time many had left their homes in the densely populated eastern states. Many of them later remembered their time spent in the wide-open spaces of the West with affection, and many later returned to tour the region or become residents.

Participation in the CCC was voluntary, although the various camps often adopted military-like rules of discipline and protocol. Ickes put his CCC “armies” to work on a wide array of conservation projects. Some young men spent their days planting trees in national forests, while others built roads and dams, fought forest fires, or made improvements in national parks like Glacier and Yellowstone. In exchange for their labor, the CCC men received a minimal wage, part of which was automatically sent to their families back home. The program thus provided employment for unskilled young men while simultaneously pumping federal money into the depressed national economy.

The training provided by the CCC proved particularly valuable to the 77,000 Indian and Hispanic youths who worked in the Southwest. Many of these young men left the CCC able to drive and repair large trucks and tractors, skills that proved highly employable during WWII. Likewise, many former CCC enlistees found the transition to life as a WWII soldier eased by their previous experience with military-like discipline.

Despite the rigid regimentation and low pay, the CCC remained popular with both enlistees and the public throughout its history. By the time Congress abolished the agency in 1942, more than two million men had served, making the CCC one of the most successful government training and employment projects in history.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 10, 2015 3:04:34 AM

1866 – The ASPCA was founded by Henry Bergh. Three years prior, having been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to a diplomatic post of the Russian Czar Alexander II of the Russian Court, Mr. Bergh witnessed work horses being beaten. When returning to America, he visited the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in London and was determined to create a Society in America.
Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 9, 2015 12:20:24 PM

2005 – Charles, Prince of Wales marries Camilla Parker Bowles in a civil ceremony at Windsor's Guildhall.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 9, 2015 12:19:04 PM

Henry V Becomes King of England (1413)
Henry was knighted by Richard II in 1399 and created prince of Wales when his father, Henry IV, usurped the throne the same year. Although his early recklessness was celebrated—and probably exaggerated—by Shakespeare, Henry became a great popular hero. He lifted England from the near anarchy of his father's reign to civil order and a high spirit of nationalism. His main interest, however, was in gaining control of lands in France—lands that he sincerely believed to be his right.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 9, 2015 9:49:13 AM

* 1865 - At Appomattox, Virginia, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. Forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed constantly by Union cavalry, Lee had no other option.

In retreating from the Union army’s Appomattox Campaign, the Army of Northern Virginia had stumbled through the Virginia countryside stripped of food and supplies. At one point, Union cavalry forces under General Philip Sheridan had actually outrun Lee’s army, blocking their retreat and taking 6,000 prisoners at Sayler’s Creek. Desertions were mounting daily, and by April 8 the Confederates were surrounded with no possibility of escape. On April 9, Lee sent a message to Grant announcing his willingness to surrender. The two generals met in the parlor of the Wilmer McLean home at one o’clock in the afternoon.

Lee and Grant, both holding the highest rank in their respective armies, had known each other slightly during the Mexican War and exchanged awkward personal inquiries. Characteristically, Grant arrived in his muddy field uniform while Lee had turned out in full dress attire, complete with sash and sword. Lee asked for the terms, and Grant hurriedly wrote them out. All officers and men were to be pardoned, and they would be sent home with their private property–most important, the horses, which could be used for a late spring planting. Officers would keep their side arms, and Lee’s starving men would be given Union rations.

Shushing a band that had begun to play in celebration, General Grant told his officers, “The war is over. The Rebels are our countrymen again.” Although scattered resistance continued for several weeks, for all practical purposes the Civil War had come to an end.

Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 8, 2015 9:07:52 PM

* 1974 - Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves hits his 715th career home run, breaking Babe Ruth’s legendary record of 714 homers. A crowd of 53,775 people, the largest in the history of Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, was with Aaron that night to cheer when he hit a 4th inning pitch off the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Al Downing. However, as Aaron was an African American who had received death threats and racist hate mail during his pursuit of one of baseball’s most distinguished records, the achievement was bittersweet.

Henry Louis Aaron Jr., born in Mobile, Alabama, on February 5, 1934, made his Major League debut in 1954 with the Milwaukee Braves, just eight years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier and became the first African American to play in the majors. Aaron, known as hard working and quiet, was the last Negro league player to also compete in the Major Leagues. In 1957, with characteristically little fanfare, Aaron, who primarily played right field, was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player as the Milwaukee Braves won the pennant. A few weeks later, his three home runs in the World Series helped his team triumph over the heavily favored New York Yankees. Although “Hammerin’ Hank” specialized in home runs, he was also an extremely dependable batter, and by the end of his career he held baseball’s career record for most runs batted in: 2,297.

Aaron’s playing career spanned three teams and 23 years. He was with the Milwaukee Braves from 1954 to 1965, the Atlanta Braves from 1966 to 1974 and the Milwaukee Brewers from 1975 to 1976. He hung up his cleats in 1976 with 755 career home runs and went on to become one of baseball’s first African-American executives, with the Atlanta Braves, and a leading spokesperson for minority hiring. Hank Aaron was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.

Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 8, 2015 1:11:05 PM

Krak des Chevaliers Conquered (1271)
One of the most important preserved medieval military castles in the world, the Krak des Chevaliers in Syria was the headquarters of the Knights Hospitaller during the Crusades. The largest Crusader fortress in the Holy Land, it could hold up to 2,000 soldiers and included a chapel, a storage facility, and two stables that could accommodate up to 1,000 horses. Though it is estimated that the Hospitallers could have withstood a siege for five years, the fortress was captured in 1271.
Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 8, 2015 3:13:56 AM

1904 – Times Square was renamed from Longacre Square. It was named after The New York Times.
Profile Pic
rjojo40AL
Champion Author Nevada

Posts:5,094
Points:900,665
Joined:Oct 2010
Message Posted: Apr 7, 2015 12:24:16 PM

Thomas D'Arcy McGee (1868)Is First Canadian Politician to Be Assassinated
Thomas D'Arcy McGee was a journalist, Canadian Father of Confederation, and the only Canadian victim of political assassination at the federal level. Patrick J. Whelan, a Fenian sympathizer, was convicted and hanged for the murder, but many now suspect that he was simply a scapegoat and not the killer. The bullet that took McGee's life had been in the possession of the Library and Archives Canada but was recently reported missing.
Profile Pic
nraacct
Champion Author North Carolina

Posts:10,090
Points:1,860,700
Joined:Jul 2004
Message Posted: Apr 7, 2015 12:21:41 PM

1980 – The United States severs relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran.
Profile Pic
cgstach
Champion Author Chicago

Posts:23,134
Points:4,728,580
Joined:Oct 2001
Message Posted: Apr 7, 2015 10:07:10 AM

* 1776 - Navy Captain John Barry, commander of the American warship Lexington, makes the first American naval capture of a British vessel when he takes command of the British warship HMS Edward off the coast of Virginia. The capture of the Edward and its cargo turned Captain Barry into a national hero and boosted the morale of the Continental forces.

Barry was born in the seaboard county of Wexford, Ireland, in 1745 and offered his services to the Continental Congress upon the outbreak of the American Revolution. Congress purchased Barry’s ship, Black Prince, which it renamed Alfred and placed under the command of Commodore Esek Hopkins. It was the first ship to fly the American flag, raised by John Paul Jones.

Barry served with distinction throughout the American Revolution. At sea, he had continued success with the Lexington. On land, he raised a volunteer force to assist General Washington in the surprisingly successful Trenton, New Jersey, campaign of 1776-77. On May 29, 1781, Barry was wounded while successfully capturing the HMS Atlanta and the HMS Trepassy while in command of a new ship, Alliance. He recovered and successfully concluded the final naval battle of the Revolutionary War with a victory over the HMS Sybylle in March 1783.

Barry’s outstanding career has been memorialized on both sides of the Atlantic. A bridge bearing his name crosses the Delaware River, and Brooklyn, New York, is home to a park named for him. In addition, four U.S. Navy ships and a building at Villanova University carry his name, and statues in his honor stand in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and his birthplace, Wexford, Ireland. On September 13, 1981, President Ronald Reagan declared Commodore John Barry Day to honor a man he called one of the earliest and greatest American patriots, a man of great insight who perceived very early the need for American power on the sea.

Profile Pic
lvskyguy
Champion Author Las Vegas

Posts:8,332
Points:1,267,010
Joined:Mar 2012
Message Posted: Apr 7, 2015 3:06:43 AM

1940 – Booker T. Washington became the first Afro-American to be pictured on a U.S. postage stamp.
Post a reply Back to Topics