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pghbill
Champion Author
Pittsburgh

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Message Posted: Sep 21, 2013 10:07:52 PM

We use mini vans for our window treatment business but need to get something bigger, how do you get reliable fuel economy figures for the bigger work vans and step vans?
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pghbill
Champion Author Pittsburgh

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Message Posted: Oct 21, 2013 11:55:17 PM

we keep debating if we should buy a prious for sales calls
Jedidiah
Champion Author Maine

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Message Posted: Oct 16, 2013 4:15:58 PM

Keep your tires balanced, aligned, and properly inflated. Shop for fuel in advance of each purchase on GasBuddies rather than buy when you're nearly out at the nearest gas stop. Watch your air filter. Do not accelerate beyond the speed limit when climbing hills. Do not carry equipment you will not be needing for your day's work. Lastly keep in mind that God will bless your wise efforts that you make in order that you may provide for your daily needs and not be a burden to others while serving him.
Glasman
Champion Author South Carolina

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Message Posted: Oct 4, 2013 1:02:37 PM

399.700
GLM4205
Champion Author Toledo

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Message Posted: Oct 4, 2013 11:06:33 AM

I don't have one.
HotRod10
Champion Author Wyoming

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Message Posted: Oct 2, 2013 10:15:32 AM

You could try adding a trailer hitch and cargo carrier to the minivan. Maybe look into a small trailer for bigger jobs. Also, look at the interior to see if you can make modifications to make better use of the existing space. The most economical solution will be to make the vehicle you've got work. Just my 2 cents worth.
ricebike
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Oct 2, 2013 6:12:31 AM

depending on your type of engine

standard cargo vans from Ford or GM ranges from 8-12 mpg depending on the driving conditions

stepvans are similar; diesel powered can squeeze out a bit more than the gas engine

don't rule out the isuzu diesel as well...

[Edited by: ricebike at 10/2/2013 6:13:52 AM EST]
oilpan4
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2013 10:14:27 PM

If it does see a lot of high way time then a big air dam and side skirts would help.

If it doesn't work then why are most tractor trailers equipped with them?
pghbill
Champion Author Pittsburgh

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Message Posted: Oct 1, 2013 6:23:22 PM

thanks for the responses, We do quite bit of interstate driving with plenty of city and suburban driving. Our Chrysler T & C tends to average 25 on the highways around Pittsburgh, and up to about 28 in hill less areas like Cleveland. Around town it seems to range between 16 to 20 mpg. However looking at Vans where EPA figures are available even the Ford Transits and others don't exceed those figures. We rarely haul ladders on the roof racks.We would like to go to a larger van or even a step van but not being able to find out what they burn in fuel makes that a last resort. I've thought of the diesel Sprinters but the extra expense to buy one along with Mercedes hedging their gas mileage stops me.
dontuknowOH
Champion Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Sep 30, 2013 3:22:52 AM

Most utility work vans I see driven in the city/sub-burbs all seem to have either top ladder racks or on the sides other racks for material transport. These or some have gas engines and frequently seen quickly seen repeatedly starting/stopping with traffic.

Although some may have small cu. in gas engines, I believe those vehicles need a longer stroke lower rpm diesel engine to provide the extra torque for those repeated conditions along with an over-drive road gearing.

I have watched a local pick-up garbage truck used weekly, sometimes a woman driver, that truck is in constant modes of stopped, revved up to start moving ahead a few feet(being loaded) then braked, revved again(repeat action for motion) braked every est. every 20-30 feet on it's weekly route. It's a diesel powered truck with lots of black smoke each hard revved-up heavy load interval( saying females hit the go/pedal harder) The pedal action is the key, rather that pedal/engine governor setting needs a mode change. Dual purpose mode change... Just an observation.

As for work vans with ladders and non aerodynamic tools/gear strapped on the exterior kills mileage after all they move along faster than garbage trucks, just look over your van then what do you see, then maybe change for better mileage. Super large side mirrors are drags also, depends....
oilpan4
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 29, 2013 10:03:15 PM

Its hard to get city milage up with an existing vehicle.

Check the alignment, I have read tests where a bad front end alignment can cause a 10% loss in MPGs in both city and highway driving.
GrumpyCat
Champion Author Alabama

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2013 11:31:03 PM

I would guess a window treatment business spends little time on interstate. So undercarriage aerodynamics will have almost no effect on MPG in that application.
dontuknowOH
Champion Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Sep 28, 2013 10:23:05 PM

This is only my idea for large vans; It seems to me that streamlining the undercarriage might really help to aid the aerodynamics of any bulky van vehicle. Yes any enclosure would then make labor costs more time deficient when repairs are needed.

Smoother air flow underside seems very possible and wind tunnel tests could reveal the results, I am only speculating here along with extra costs of material needed, really there are not too many major repairs needed to that area that often(underside).

I'm assuming the total weight of such material to do any streamlining wouldn't add much weight, I really don't know The V/S balance of cost added V/S mileage benefit. This may have already been tried... before...
oilpan4
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Sep 27, 2013 1:21:31 PM

If you want a van with better fuel economy then check out ecomodder.com.

"You do like everyone else in business, you pass the cost of gas on down to the customer in your prices."

And you wonder why businesses fail.
What you do is get innovative to stay ahead of the other guy. If you can burn less fuel to do the same job as the other guys you can charge less than the other guy for the same service and pocket more money at the same time.
MertieMan
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Sep 25, 2013 5:23:26 AM

You do like everyone else in business, you pass the cost of gas on down to the customer in your prices.
WEPSMAN
Champion Author South Dakota

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Message Posted: Sep 24, 2013 9:18:34 AM

Go with what Grumpy says.
OceanArcher
Champion Author Mississippi

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Message Posted: Sep 22, 2013 8:49:42 AM

GrumpyCat has the right idea ...
GrumpyCat
Champion Author Alabama

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Message Posted: Sep 21, 2013 11:27:56 PM

Diesel Sprinter or the new 2014 diesel Ford Transit.
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