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Author Topic: Michelin Defender tires Back to Topics
euro11

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Miami

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Message Posted: Aug 12, 2013 10:46:01 AM

We have always had Michelin tires on our cars and love them. Recently we replaced a set of Michelin Hydroedge with a set of Michelin Defenders. All the reviews are great, and their mileage rating was 8 (Hydroedge was 7). We drive 100 miles a day commuting to and from work in a Dodge Grand Caravan, which only makes 22 mpg on highway. As soon as we changed to the new tires our mileage went down 3 mpgs. We have already driven 2500 miles on them and still no improvement. We even re-aligned and re-balanced the tires to see if that would help, but nada.

Is anybody else having the same issue with these tires? The handling is great, but the gas mileage is killing us.
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gvan
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Apr 3, 2014 2:21:58 PM

"Great answers everyone! The Mechanic had put 34-36 in the front snow tires. The manufacturer states maximum 51... So, I put myself 42 in the front and 36 at the back."

What manufacturer? Auto or tire? Go by the auto manufacturers recommended PSI and not the maximum PSI the tire manufacturer places on the tire.
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pilotdlh
All-Star Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Feb 20, 2014 1:31:57 PM

Yeah, FarmTech, that's why I don't drive my truck, 8-10 mpg.
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CentaurChiron
Veteran Author Toronto

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2014 10:11:32 PM

Great answers everyone! The Mechanic had put 34-36 in the front snow tires. The manufacturer states maximum 51... So, I put myself 42 in the front and 36 at the back. Drives like a charm! I may even more put tonight...

[Edited by: CentaurChiron at 2/19/2014 10:12:14 PM EST]
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FarmTech
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2014 5:03:34 PM


I wholeheartedly agree with pilotdlh.

In snow and winter weather, I would rather drive the car than the 4WD truck or SUV. The only exception is if the snow is over 10" deep on the road, then the undercarriage will scrape, which can lead to severe damage to suspension components. Even Worse, if the snow is deep and heavy enough, you can actually drive your vehicle up onto packed snow -- can be packed by the weight of the vehicle -- and you will be stuck. You will be stuck until either the snow melts or you get pulled off.

I can not wait until the older Michelin X-Radial wear out on our other vehicles, so we can put Defenders on them.

The truck is a 4WD beast with a 12,000 lb. winch on the front. I can put the tire chocks down and pull huge stumps out of the ground. I have made my share of money pulling stranded motorists out of all the situations they manage to get themselves into in the snow. They are so happy when I pull up, I do not even have to ask for anything, they just start throwing money at me. When the State police issue warnings stating you have to have chains and/or the right vehicle, they do not want that $300 ticket. The only drawback is the 8 to 10 MPG the truck gets when working in 4WD. Probably the best reason to drive the car -- high cost of fuel.

All those dummies with Front Wheel Drive think they are going somewhere in the snow, not gonna happen. Even AWD and 4WD is not impervious. Be safe out there.
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pilotdlh
All-Star Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2014 12:24:57 PM

I have Michelin Defenders on my 04 Chevy Impala and my wife's Ford Freestyle.
Before I bought them, I did a lot of research online. What I found is that you can't learn much from the reviews. Some people loved them, some people hated them. Some claimed gas mileage drops, some claimed they are way noisier.
I finally just bought them and moved on. The gas mileage has not been affected one bit. The road noise was so quiet that I couldn't even hear the tires from inside the car. We both drive all winter in the snow up here and they have great traction. I have a 4x4 truck and I still drive my car in snow storms.
I have had NO complaints with my Michelin Defenders. But, the tire shop that put them on likes to put about 30 psi in the tires. I prefer about 35. Like other people have said, tire pressure matters.
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contiki
Champion Author Ontario

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Message Posted: Feb 18, 2014 6:45:07 AM

We use Michelin Ice tire in the winter months on both our Hondas......

We use Michelin Harmony in the summer months.....

We really like Michelin tires and have used them for years now.....
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OceanArcher
Champion Author Mississippi

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Message Posted: Feb 4, 2014 4:57:33 PM

I'm a Firestone person - I don't do Michelin
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redfish67
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Feb 1, 2014 12:37:40 PM

So do Bridgestones, but they're great tires.
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Glasman
Champion Author South Carolina

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Message Posted: Feb 1, 2014 10:17:07 AM

Michelin are good tires [BUT] the sure attract nails. NO JOKE.
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dassfg
Champion Author Fort Worth

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Message Posted: Feb 1, 2014 8:45:25 AM

Go Goodyear
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FarmTech
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Jan 31, 2014 10:42:13 PM


I think your tires are NOT properly inflated and I do NOT mean what the manufacturer recommends.

I have these tires. I love them. Best handling tires I ever had, next the the Michelin LT2's on my truck. My gas mileage actually went up by around 2 MPG with them, as opposed to the OEM Continentals that were on the vehicle.

I agree with several posters here regarding air pressure. You need to check you air pressure at least once in week. In this crazy cold weather, which depends on where you are and can be in 50's one day and the low teens the next, you need to CHECK THEM DAILY.

I HIGHLY recommend that you not only have your own Air Gauge, it needs to be the Bourdon Tube type, which is NOT affected by changes in humidity, temperature or altitude. These gauges are extremely accurate and, unless you drop or damage them, NEVER lose their accuracy.

For every 10 degree F. change in air temperature -- depends on direction of change -- your tires will gain or lose 1 PSI. In some tires, this change can be almost 2 PSI, with about 40 percent of all tires registering a change around 1.5 PSI.

From the Michelin Rep and Tire Dealers that really know about this tire, it was designed to ride "harsh". Specifically, it should be kept inflated more than most tires but not exceeding the Max. HOT Pressure. This will make the "ride" in most vehicles to appear very rough or "firm". When you have tires that are inflated to the upper hot values, you will start to feel every bit of the road surface -- every little bump and imperfection. That is Michelin's secret to the long tread life of these tires -- they have a stiffer than normal side wall design and materials.

Generally as a rule, I do NOT go by the Tire Inflation placard on the vehicle or the manufacturer's recommendations. The reason I do not is that I will keep my tires inflated to the upper hot limits, but not exceeding the maximum hot safe inflation by WHAT IS ON THE TIRE from the manufacturer. Most vehicle manufacturers have values below that -- some are way below (unsafe IMHO) those values -- so that the vehicle will have a "softer" ride quality. Not me. I go for firm ride, which also yields maximum control. The other thing it does is provide MUCH GREATER safety. What do I mean ?? Have you ever seen what actually happens to the sidewall of a radial tire when in a severe -- i.e. emergency -- maneuver ?? The tire will start to actual "roll" under the rim of the wheel. If the force gets so great and the tire is not inflated to upper hot pressures, the bead can actually become unseated from the rim, causing sudden, catastrophic failure.

Since many vehicles -- especially Front Wheel Drive -- have anywhere from 55 to 60 percent of the total vehicle weight in the front, you should have your front tires be inflated about 1.5 to 2.0 PSI more than your rear tires. Even if the weight balance is closer to 50-50, I would still keep the front tires inflated in this manner. It may just save your life in an emergency maneuver, plus should yield max gas mileage.

I keep my tires inflated to 36.5 PSI Hot in the Front and 35.0 PSI Hot in the Rear. When the temperature -- such as when it warms up in the afternoon -- changes, I will let them go to about 38.5 Hot Front and 37.0 Hot Rear. The pressure will be reduced when cold in the morning.

That is another good thing about those Bourdon Tube type gauges, you can read inflation in 0.5 PSI increments. Most also have a "Release Valve", so you can slowly and safely bleed off excess hot air pressure. HTH.
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charladan
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Jan 31, 2014 9:55:48 PM

write the manufacturer. I am sure they want to help
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OceanArcher
Champion Author Mississippi

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Message Posted: Jan 31, 2014 10:47:52 AM

I'm a Firestone man - all the way
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pawnkingfour
Champion Author Georgia

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Message Posted: Jan 30, 2014 6:59:39 PM

Always replace with the same size as the original, and check air pressure as recommended to get the same result as possible.
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jimmy544
Champion Author Boston

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Message Posted: Jan 30, 2014 12:19:24 PM

Never had a problem with any Michelin tires and always got good service from them.
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hoopitup2000
Champion Author Virginia

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Message Posted: Jan 30, 2014 6:52:55 AM

Not a fan of Michelin. They tend to get very noisy with age.
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twt
Champion Author Virginia Beach

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Message Posted: Jan 30, 2014 5:02:50 AM

Check the recommended air pressure.
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poetdog73
Champion Author Toledo

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Message Posted: Jan 30, 2014 1:34:34 AM

too much $$$$$$$
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Camry05
All-Star Author Indiana

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Message Posted: Jan 29, 2014 11:18:59 PM

My next set are going to be Michelin
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CentaurChiron
Veteran Author Toronto

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Message Posted: Jan 29, 2014 2:22:26 PM

Yes more air....
Don't forget that tires lose air in colder temperatures.

So, have a gauge and buy a small electric pump (that you plug in the lighter...). and maintain the psi...
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pawnkingfour
Champion Author Georgia

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Message Posted: Aug 16, 2013 8:14:21 PM

Michelin, great tires.
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smugutu1234
Champion Author Tallahassee

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Message Posted: Aug 16, 2013 4:00:26 PM

Great
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euro11
Rookie Author Miami

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Message Posted: Aug 16, 2013 3:25:40 PM

Thank you Houckster.

We had already taken it back to where we bought them and they had re-aligned and re-balanced the tires.

We were running them at 35 psi which was the OEM suggested pressure.
We had just increased it to 36 psi, but will do your trick of using different pressure in the front tires. We'll see how it goes.

Thanks for all the replies.
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smugutu1234
Champion Author Tallahassee

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Message Posted: Aug 15, 2013 7:20:43 AM

Sounds like a problem.
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OilerFan
Champion Author Tulsa

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Message Posted: Aug 15, 2013 7:11:07 AM

Take the vehicle back to the place where you bought them, and discuss it with them. They can look and see if they're inflated correctly, and if they think the tires are wearing correctly, etc.
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OceanArcher
Champion Author Mississippi

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Message Posted: Aug 14, 2013 10:08:26 AM

Almost sounds like you are running the tires underinflated
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forresj
Champion Author Wilmington

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Message Posted: Aug 14, 2013 9:17:51 AM

Sue the bastards for fraud.
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WEPSMAN
Champion Author South Dakota

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Message Posted: Aug 13, 2013 10:15:19 PM

Never had them.
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MertieMan
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Aug 13, 2013 8:00:23 AM

Have you checked your air pressure? More pressure or even slightly higher would mean a little better mileage.
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ricebike
Champion Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Aug 13, 2013 4:21:47 AM

great points, H

image views of both models favor the hydro edge to have less "rolling resistance"

you being in FL, doesn't really need that aggressive treadblock pattern of the defenders ~ just my opinion

all you needed were water channels like "the edge" for rainy seasons
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Houckster
Champion Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Aug 12, 2013 3:10:15 PM

Tires take a while to break in and if you haven't got, say 1000-1500 miles, then you may (just may) start getting better mileage.

Another thing to consider is that if you're using the OEM recommendation for tire pressure, you can get an improvement by increasing the tire pressure several pounds, just be sure the pressure does not exceed the max PSI on the sidewall.

The rounder a tire remains when you're driving the more efficiently it will roll. Consequently, the front tires should have a higher PSI than the rear tires since they bear more weight. I have used this formula for years and it works very well improving the handling as well as the mileage. I run about 4 PSI more in the front than in the rear.

[Edited by: Houckster at 8/12/2013 3:11:06 PM EST]
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